Use of surgical masks in the operating room : a review of the clinical effectiveness and guidelines

Postoperative wound infections increase length of hospital stay, cost of care, and morbidity. Infections occurring in a wound created by an invasive surgical procedure are referred to as surgical site infections (SSIs). SSIs account for a significant fraction of health care associated infections, ho...

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Corporate Author: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Ottawa (ON) Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health 2013, 19 November 2013
Series:Rapid response report: summary with critical appraisal
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: National Center for Biotechnology Information - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Summary:Postoperative wound infections increase length of hospital stay, cost of care, and morbidity. Infections occurring in a wound created by an invasive surgical procedure are referred to as surgical site infections (SSIs). SSIs account for a significant fraction of health care associated infections, however since many of these infections occur after discharge from the hospital their frequency is likely underestimated. While many SSIs cause no additional complications, they can be associated with considerable morbidity, with estimates at over one third of postoperative deaths at least partly attributable to SSIs. In the operating room (OR) there are procedures and practices in place intended to reduce the probability of infectious material transfer between OR staff and patients. Surgical face masks (SFMs) provide a physical barrier between bacteria of oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal origin and an open patient wound. Wearing a SFM in the OR is one of many long standing preventative practices, yet controversy exists as to the clinical effectiveness of SFMs in reducing the frequency of SSIs. Additionally, SFMs potentially protect OR staff by providing a physical barrier to infectious bodily fluid splashes from the patient. General purpose disposable SFMs however, are not specifically designed to protect the wearer from airborne infectious particulates. A review of clinical effectiveness and evidence-based guidelines for mask use in the OR can inform practice decisions to minimize the occurrence of SSIs and OR staff infections. The purpose of this report is to retrieve and review the existing evidence on the clinical effectiveness of wearing SFMs in the OR to prevent infections of patients and OR staff
Item Description:Title from PDF caption. - "CADTH rapid response service."
Physical Description:1 PDF file (18 pages)