Screening tools for cognitive function and driving

There are various reasons why persons holding a driver's license no longer retain the ability to drive a car. This might be e.g. stroke, traumatic brain damage, or early dementia. In order to assess the driving ability in persons with suspected cognitive impairment, there is a need for good tes...

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Main Authors: Smedslund, Geir, Giske, Liv (Author), Fleitscher, Hilde (Author), Gundro Brurberg, Kjetil (Author)
Corporate Author: Nasjonalt kunnskapssenter for helsetjenesten
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Oslo Kunnskapssenter November 2015, 2015
Series:Report
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: National Center for Biotechnology Information - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Summary:There are various reasons why persons holding a driver's license no longer retain the ability to drive a car. This might be e.g. stroke, traumatic brain damage, or early dementia. In order to assess the driving ability in persons with suspected cognitive impairment, there is a need for good tests that can categorize persons into three groups: (1) inability to drive a car, (2) sufficient ability to drive a car, (3) should be referred to a more comprehensive assessment of cognitive ability. In this report, we have provided an overview of existing cognitive screening tests for assessing functions of relevance for ability to drive a car, and how good the tests are for predicting who will pass an on-road driving test or who will experience a car accident during the first years after the screening test. Our key messages are:1. We have not found any cognitive screening tests that have good documentation of diagnostic test accuracy for predicting results on on-road driving tests. Tests that could detect at least 65 percent of dangerous drivers in all studies were the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCa, detected 70-85%), the Clock Drawing Test (detected 65-71%) and the Trail-Making Test-B (detected 70-77%). We have in most cases little or very little confidence in the results2. There was large variation in how good the tests were for predicting results on an on-road test3. There is a need for standardization of the outcome measures and the test batteries in research about screening tests for driving ability4. We can therefore not conclude about which tests are best for detecting persons with a reduced ability to drive among persons with a suspected cognitive impairment
Item Description:"This is an excerpt from the full technical report, which is written in Norwegian. The excerpt provides the report's main messages in English, No. 21-2015. Systematic review."
Physical Description:1 PDF file (7 pages)
ISBN:9788281219854