Behavioral and pharmacotherapy weight loss interventions to prevent obesity-related morbidity and mortality in adults : an updated systematic review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

or a reduction in the incidence or prevalence of obesity-related conditions among adults who are overweight or have obesity and are a candidate for weight loss interventions? 3) What are the adverse effects of primary care-relevant behavioral and/or pharmacotherapy weight loss and weight loss mainte...

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Main Author: LeBlanc, Erin
Corporate Authors: United States Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Oregon Evidence-based Practice Center (Center for Health Research (Kaiser-Permanente Medical Care Program. Northwest Region)), U.S. Preventive Services Task Force
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Rockville, MD Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 2018, September 2018
Series:Evidence synthesis
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: National Center for Biotechnology Information - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Summary:or a reduction in the incidence or prevalence of obesity-related conditions among adults who are overweight or have obesity and are a candidate for weight loss interventions? 3) What are the adverse effects of primary care-relevant behavioral and/or pharmacotherapy weight loss and weight loss maintenance interventions in adults who are overweight or have obesity and are a candidate for weight loss interventions? CONCLUSION: We found that behavior-based weight-loss interventions with or without weight loss medications resulted in more weight loss than usual care conditions. The degree of weight loss we observed with the behavior-based weight loss interventions in the current review is slightly smaller but consistent in magnitude with our 2011 review on this topic.
Our review addressed three key questions: 1) Do primary care-relevant behavioral and/or pharmacotherapy weight loss and weight loss maintenance interventions lead to improved health outcomes among adults who are overweight or have obesity and are a candidate for weight loss interventions? 2) Do primary care-relevant behavioral and/or pharmacotherapy weight loss and weight loss maintenance interventions lead to weight loss, weight loss maintenance,
OBJECTIVE: We conducted this systematic review to support the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) in updating its 2012 recommendation on screening for and treatment of adult obesity.
As in the previous review, we noted that weight loss interventions resulted in a decreased risk of developing diabetes, particularly among those with prediabetes, although the prevalence of other intermediate health outcomes was less well reported. Limited evidence exists regarding health outcomes associated with weight loss interventions. Weight loss medications, but not behavior-based interventions, were associated with higher rates of harms compared with control arms. Heterogeneity within each individual intervention arm confounded with differences in the populations, settings, and trial quality, making it difficult to disentangle which variables may be driving larger effects. Long-term weight and health outcomes data, as well as data on important subgroups (e.g. those who are older, nonwhite, or overweight) were lacking and should be a high priority for future study
Physical Description:1 PDF file (ix, 333 pages) illustrations