Forests and Insect Conservation in Australia

Losses of forests and their insect inhabitants are a major global conservation concern, spanning tropical and temperate forest regions throughout the world. This broad overview of Australian forest insect conservation draws on studies from many places to demonstrate the diversity and vulnerability o...

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Main Author: New, Tim R.
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Cham Springer International Publishing 2018, 2018
Edition:1st ed. 2018
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer eBooks 2005- - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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100 1 |a New, Tim R. 
245 0 0 |a Forests and Insect Conservation in Australia  |h Elektronische Ressource  |c by Tim R. New 
250 |a 1st ed. 2018 
260 |a Cham  |b Springer International Publishing  |c 2018, 2018 
300 |a XV, 276 p. 48 illus  |b online resource 
505 0 |a conservation perspective for invertebrates -- 3. Changes and threats to Australia’s forests -- 4. Insects in native and alien forests in Australia -- 5. Studying insects for conservation in forests -- 6. Insect flagships and indicators in forests -- 7. Conservation versus pest suppression: finding the balance -- 8. Saproxylic insects and the dilemmas of dead wood -- 9. Forest management for insects: issues and Approaches -- 10. Forest management for insect conservation in Australia 
653 |a Entomology 
653 |a Conservation biology 
653 |a Forests and forestry 
653 |a Entomology 
653 |a Applied Ecology 
653 |a Regional planning 
653 |a Applied Ecology 
653 |a Forestry 
653 |a Conservation Biology/Ecology 
653 |a Landscape/Regional and Urban Planning 
710 2 |a SpringerLink (Online service) 
041 0 7 |a eng  |2 ISO 639-2 
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856 |u https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-92222-5?nosfx=y  |x Verlag  |3 Volltext 
082 0 |a 595.7 
520 |a Losses of forests and their insect inhabitants are a major global conservation concern, spanning tropical and temperate forest regions throughout the world. This broad overview of Australian forest insect conservation draws on studies from many places to demonstrate the diversity and vulnerability of forest insects and how their conservation may be pursued through combinations of increased understanding, forest protection and silvicultural management in both natural and plantation forests. The relatively recent history of severe human disturbance to Australian forests ensures that reasonably natural forest patches remain and serve as ‘models’ for many forest categories. They are also refuges for many forest biota extirpated from the wider landscapes as forests are lost, and merit strenuous protection from further changes, and wider efforts to promote connectivity between otherwise isolated remnant patches. In parallel, the recent attention to improving forest insect conservation in harmony with insect pest management continues to benefit from perspectives generated from better-documented faunas elsewhere. Lessons from the northern hemisphere, in particular, have led to revelations of the ecological importance and vulnerability of many insect taxa in forests, together with clear evidence that ‘conservation can work’ in concert with wider forest uses. A brief outline of the variety of Australian tropical and temperate forests and woodlands, and of the multitude of endemic and, often, highly localised insects that depend on them highlights needs for conservation (both of single focal species and wider forest-dependent radiations and assemblages). The ways in which insects contribute to sustained ecological integrity of these complex ecosystems provide numerous opportunities for practical conservation.