Using future Internet technologies to strengthen criminal justice

"Future World Wide Web technologies commonly labeled as being part of Web 3.0 and Web 4.0 could substantially change how the criminal justice enterprise operates. These notably include Semantic Web technologies, intelligent agents, and the Internet of Things. In September 2014, RAND conducted a...

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Main Authors: Hollywood, John S., Woods, Dulani (Author), Silberglitt, R. S. (Author), Jackson, Brian A. (Author)
Corporate Authors: Public Safety and Justice Program (Rand Corporation), National Institute of Justice (U.S.), United States Department of Justice, Police Executive Research Forum, RTI International, University of Denver
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: [Santa Monica, CA] RAND Corporation [2015]©2015, 2015
Series:[Research report]
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: JSTOR Open Access Books - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Summary:"Future World Wide Web technologies commonly labeled as being part of Web 3.0 and Web 4.0 could substantially change how the criminal justice enterprise operates. These notably include Semantic Web technologies, intelligent agents, and the Internet of Things. In September 2014, RAND conducted an expert panel for the National Institute of Justice to discuss how the criminal justice community can take advantage of (and reduce the risks from) these emerging technologies. The top unifying theme from the panel was to leverage web technologies to improve information-sharing and protection across the criminal justice enterprise, and to address challenges that the new technologies raise. Another major theme was improving practitioners' knowledge of web technologies. Priorities included general education on key web technologies, and model policies and procedures for using them. A third theme was to improve the networking infrastructure needed to support web technologies (and other applications), especially for courts and corrections. Fourth, several needs became apparent related to leveraging wearable and embedded sensors (part of the Internet of Things), with an emphasis on using sensors to improve officer health and safety. Finally, panelists frequently noted the importance of civil rights, privacy rights, and cybersecurity protections in using the emerging technologies for criminal justice. While there were few needs about these topics specifically, panelists noted that more than half of the needs raised security, privacy, or civil rights concerns, or had implied requirements on these topics"--Publisher's description
Item Description:"Priority Criminal Justice Needs Initiative: A project of the RAND Corporation, the Police Executive Research Forum, RTI International, and the University of Denver"--Cover. - Caption title
Physical Description:31 pages color illustrations, color charts