Considering the creation of a domestic intelligence agency in the United States lessons from the experiences of Australia, Canada, France, Germany, and the United Kingdom

With terrorism still prominent on the U.S. agenda, whether the country's prevention efforts match the threat the United States faces continues to be central in policy debate. One element of this debate is questioning whether the United States should create a dedicated domestic intelligence agen...

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Main Author: Jackson, Brian A.
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Santa Monica, CA RAND 2009, 2009
Series:Rand Corporation monograph series
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: JSTOR Open Access Books - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Summary:With terrorism still prominent on the U.S. agenda, whether the country's prevention efforts match the threat the United States faces continues to be central in policy debate. One element of this debate is questioning whether the United States should create a dedicated domestic intelligence agency. Case studies of five other democracies--Australia, Canada, France, Germany, and the UK --provide lessons and common themes that may help policymakers decide. The authors find that: most of the five countries separate the agency that conducts domestic intelligence gathering from any arrest and detention powers; each country has instituted some measure of external oversight over its domestic intelligence agency; liaison with other international, foreign, state, and local agencies helps ensure the best sharing of information; the boundary between domestic and international intelligence activities may be blurring.--Publisher description
Item Description:Title from electronic t.p. (viewed Mar. 2, 2009). - Prepared for the Department of Homeland Security
Physical Description:xxi, 194 pages
ISBN:1282451138
9781282451131
0833046179
9780833046178