Benefits and harms of the Mediterranean diet compared to other diets

A large number of epidemiologic studies have investigated the association between diet and mortality and morbidity. Of particular recent interest is the Mediterranean diet, first described by Ancel Keys over 50 years ago. This diet is characterized by high intake of olive oil, fruits and vegetables,...

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Main Authors: Bloomfield, Hanna E., Kane, Robert L. (Author), Wilt, Timothy J. (Author), Koeller, Eva (Author)
Corporate Authors: United States Department of Veterans Affairs, Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (U.S.), Minneapolis VA Health Care System (U.S.) VA Evidence Synthesis Program
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Washington, D.C. Department of Veterans Affairs November 2015, 2015
Series:Evidence-based synthesis program
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: National Center for Biotechnology Information - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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100 1 |a Bloomfield, Hanna E. 
245 0 0 |a Benefits and harms of the Mediterranean diet compared to other diets  |h Elektronische Ressource  |c principal investigator, Hanna E. Bloomfield ; co-investigators, Robert Kane, Timothy, Wilt, Eva Koeller, Nancy Greer ; research associate, Roderick MacDonald 
260 |a Washington, D.C.  |b Department of Veterans Affairs  |c November 2015, 2015 
300 |a 1 PDF file (v, 152 pages)  |b illustrations 
505 0 |a Includes bibliographical references 
653 |a Diet, Mediterranean 
700 1 |a Kane, Robert L.  |e [author] 
700 1 |a Wilt, Timothy J.  |e [author] 
700 1 |a Koeller, Eva  |e [author] 
710 2 |a United States  |b Department of Veterans Affairs 
710 2 |a Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (U.S.) 
710 2 |a Minneapolis VA Health Care System (U.S.)  |b VA Evidence Synthesis Program 
041 0 7 |a eng  |2 ISO 639-2 
989 |b NCBI  |a National Center for Biotechnology Information 
490 0 |a Evidence-based synthesis program 
856 |u https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK379574  |3 Volltext 
082 0 |a 610 
520 |a A large number of epidemiologic studies have investigated the association between diet and mortality and morbidity. Of particular recent interest is the Mediterranean diet, first described by Ancel Keys over 50 years ago. This diet is characterized by high intake of olive oil, fruits and vegetables, whole grains and cereals, legumes, fish, and nuts; low intake of red meat, dairy products, and sweets; and moderate intake of red wine with meals. Epidemiologic studies have shown that the incidence of cardiovascular disease in populations that consume such diets is lower than in populations that consume a more typical "Western" diet that is rich in red meat, dairy products, processed and artificially sweetened foods, and salt, with minimal intake of fruits, vegetables, fish, legumes, and whole grains. Based on these epidemiologic studies, several randomized controlled trials were conducted to test the hypothesis that adopting a Mediterranean diet in adulthood reduces chronic disease burden (eg, incidence of and/ or mortality from cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, hypertension, cognitive impairment, and kidney disease) and/or all-cause mortality (viz, PREDIMED, Lyon Heart Study, THIS-DIET). These trials included populations from a variety of geographical locations and with a spectrum of demographic and clinical characteristics. Although several systematic reviews of the relevant observational studies and clinical trials have been published, the VA's Evidence-based Synthesis Program, in conjunction with the Office of Quality and Performance and in response to a request from the VA's National Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and Primary Care Services, commissioned the present study to update prior reviews and to specifically assess the implications for the treatment and prevention of common chronic conditions in the Veteran population