Bushmen of the Kalahari

The San people, more commonly known as Bushmen, are believed to be the earliest inhabitants of southern Africa. They have lived for 80,000 years as hunter-gatherers in the Kalahari Desert, and are well-known for their expert survival skills in a harsh environment. Their unique clicking languages and...

Full description

Main Author: Ely, Paula
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: New York, NY Filmakers Library 2006, 2006
Series:Ethnographic video online, volume 1
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Ethnographic Video Online Vol. 1 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Summary:The San people, more commonly known as Bushmen, are believed to be the earliest inhabitants of southern Africa. They have lived for 80,000 years as hunter-gatherers in the Kalahari Desert, and are well-known for their expert survival skills in a harsh environment. Their unique clicking languages and their astonishing method of healing through trance dancing have made them a source of worldwide fascination. But these peaceful people have long faced pressures from dominant tribes and European settlers. Recently, cattle ranches, diamond mines and other projects have confined the San to a small portion of the land they once freely roamed. Having been forcibly evicted from their last remaining homeland and relocated into settlements, they must depend on governmental and outside aid. In spite of these challenges, the Bushmen have now begun to stand up for their heritage, their land and their dignity. They have realized that they can benefit economically from their distinctive knowledge and cultural traditions by organizing cultural safaris and selling their indigenous arts and crafts. They are engaged in a legal battle to recover a small portion of their native homeland in the Kalahari. The film takes a unique look at the fascinating history, brutal struggles and the daunting challenges the Bushmen face in the 21st century
Item Description:Title from resource description page (viewed May 24, 2011)
Physical Description:1 online resource (56 min.)