Genocide in Jewish thought

Among the topics explored in this book are ways of viewing the soul, the relation between body and soul, environmentalist thought, the phenomenon of torture, and the philosophical and theological warrants for genocide. Presenting an analysis of abstract modes of thought that have contributed to geno...

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Main Author: Patterson, David
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Cambridge Cambridge University Press 2012
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Cambridge Books Online - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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245 0 0 |a Genocide in Jewish thought  |c David Patterson, University of Texas at Dallas 
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505 0 |a a name, not an essence -- 1. Why Jewish thought, and what makes it Jewish? -- 2. Deadly philosophical abstraction -- 3. The stranger in your midst -- 4. Nefesh: the soul as flesh and blood -- 5. The environmentalist contribution to genocide -- 6. Torture -- 7. Hunger and homelessness -- 8. Philosophy, religion, and genocide -- A concluding reflection on body and soul 
653 |a Genocide / Philosophy 
653 |a Thought and thinking / Philosophy 
653 |a Jewish philosophy 
653 |a Humanity / Philosophy 
653 |a Jewish ethics / Philosophy 
653 |a Philosophy and religion 
653 |a Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) 
653 |a Hebrew language / Roots 
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520 |a Among the topics explored in this book are ways of viewing the soul, the relation between body and soul, environmentalist thought, the phenomenon of torture, and the philosophical and theological warrants for genocide. Presenting an analysis of abstract modes of thought that have contributed to genocide, the book argues that a Jewish model of concrete thinking may inform our understanding of the abstractions that can lead to genocide. Its aim is to draw upon distinctively Jewish categories of thought to demonstrate how the conceptual defacing of the other human being serves to promote the murder of peoples, and to suggest a way of thinking that might help prevent genocide