The specification of human actions in St. Thomas Aquinas

Thomas Aquinas believed that human actions can be identified by species, such as murder, theft, or almsgiving. He used five different terms - end, object, matter, circumstance and motive. This text examines how one determines to which species an act belongs

Main Author: Pilsner, Joseph
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Oxford Oxford University Press 2006, 2006
Series:Oxford theological monographs / Oxford theological monographs
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Oxford University Press - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
LEADER 01187nmm a2200277 u 4500
001 EB000731239
003 EBX01000000000000000584321
005 00000000000000.0
007 cr|||||||||||||||||||||
008 180413 ||| eng
020 |a 9780191603808 
050 4 |a B765.T54 
100 1 |a Pilsner, Joseph 
245 0 0 |a The specification of human actions in St. Thomas Aquinas  |h Elektronische Ressource  |c Joseph Pilsner 
260 |a Oxford  |b Oxford University Press  |c 2006, 2006 
300 |a xi, 273 p. 
505 0 |a Includes bibliographical references and index 
600 1 4 |a Thomas / Aquinas, Saint / 1225?-1274 
653 |a Ethics 
041 0 7 |a eng  |2 ISO 639-2 
989 |b OUP  |a Oxford University Press 
490 0 |a Oxford theological monographs / Oxford theological monographs 
856 |u http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199286051.001.0001?nosfx=y  |x Verlag  |3 Volltext 
082 0 |a 170.42 
520 |a Thomas Aquinas believed that human actions can be identified by species, such as murder, theft, or almsgiving. He used five different terms - end, object, matter, circumstance and motive. This text examines how one determines to which species an act belongs