Programming in Prolog : Using the ISO Standard

We have added new material to Chapter 3 to give an account of up-to-date programming techniques using accumulators and difference structures. Chapter 8 contains some new information on syntax errors. Operator precedences are now compatible with the most widely-used implementations. We have made furt...

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Main Authors: Clocksin, William F., Mellish, Christopher S. (Author)
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Berlin, Heidelberg Springer Berlin Heidelberg 1987, 1987
Edition:3rd ed. 1987
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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020 |a 9783642970054 
100 1 |a Clocksin, William F. 
245 0 0 |a Programming in Prolog  |h Elektronische Ressource  |b Using the ISO Standard  |c by William F. Clocksin, Christopher S. Mellish 
250 |a 3rd ed. 1987 
260 |a Berlin, Heidelberg  |b Springer Berlin Heidelberg  |c 1987, 1987 
300 |a XIV, 281 p  |b online resource 
505 0 |a 1 -- Gives the student a “feel” for what it is like to program in Prolog. Introduces objects, relationships, facts, rules, variables -- 1.1 Facts -- 1.2 Questions -- 1.3 Variables -- 1.4 Conjunctions -- 1.5 Rules -- 1.6 Summary and Exercises -- 2 -- More detailed presentation of Prolog syntax and data structures -- 2.1 Syntax -- 2.2 Characters -- 2.3 Operators -- 2.4 Equality and Matching -- 2.5 Arithmetic -- 2.6 Summary of Satisfying Goals -- 3 -- Representing objects and relationships by using “trees” and “lists”. Developing several standard Prolog programming techniques -- 3.1 Structures and Trees -- 3.2 Lists -- 3.3 Recursive Search -- 3.4 Mapping -- 3.5 Recursive Comparison -- 3.6 Joining Structures Together -- 3.7 Accumulators -- 3.8 Difference Structures -- 4 -- How a set of clauses generates a set of solutions. Using “cut” to modify the control sequence of running Prolog programs -- 4.1 Generating Multiple Solutions -- 4.2 The “Cut” --  
505 0 |a 4.3 Common Uses of the Cut -- 4.4 Problems with the Cut -- 5 -- Facilities available for the input and output of characters and structures. Developing a program to read sentences from the user and represent the sentence as a list of words, which can be used with the Grammar Rules of Chapter 9 -- 5.1 Reading and Writing Terms -- 5.2 Reading and Writing Characters -- 5.3 Reading English Sentences -- 5.4 Reading and Writing Files -- 5.5 Declaring Operators -- 6 -- Definition of the “core” built-in predicates, with sensible examples of how each one is used. By this point, the reader should be able to read reasonably complex programs, and should therefore be able to absorb the built-in predicates by seeing them in use -- 6.1 Entering New Clauses -- 6.2 Success and Failure -- 6.3 Classifying Terms -- 6.4 Treating Clauses as Terms -- 6.5 Constructing and Accessing Components of Structures -- 6.6 Affecting Backtracking -- 6.7 Constructing Compound Goals -- 6.8 Equality --  
505 0 |a D. Edinburgh Prolog -- E. micro-Prolog 
505 0 |a 8.2 Common Errors -- 8.3 The Tracing Model -- 8.4 Tracing and Spy Points -- 8.5 Fixing Bugs -- 9 -- Applications of existing techniques. Using Grammar Rules. Examining the design decisions for some aspects of analysing natural language with Grammar Rules -- 9.1 The Parsing Problem -- 9.2 Representing the Parsing Problem in Prolog -- 9.3 The Grammar Rule Notation -- 9.4 Adding Extra Arguments -- 9.5 Adding Extra Tests -- 9.6 Summary -- 10 -- Predicate Calculus, clausal form, resolution theorem proving, logic programming -- 10.1 Brief Introduction to Predicate Calculus -- 10.2 Clausal Form -- 10.3 A Notation for Clauses -- 10.4 Resolution and Proving Theorems -- 10.5 Horn Clauses -- 10.6 Prolog -- 10.7 Prolog and Logic Programming -- 11 -- A selection of suggested exercises, projects, and problems -- 11.1 Easier Projects -- 11.2 Advanced Projects -- Appendices -- A. Answers to Selected Exercises -- B. Clausal Form Program Listings -- C. Different Versions of Prolog --  
505 0 |a random, gensym, findall -- 7.9 Searching Graphs -- 7.10 Sift the Two’s and Sift the Three’s -- 7.11 Symbolic Differentiation -- 7.12 Mapping Structures and Transforming Trees -- 7.13 Manipulating Programs -- 8 -- By this point, the reader will be able to write reasonable programs, and so the problem of debugging will be relevant. Flow of control model, hints about common bugs, techniques of debugging -- 8.1 Laying out Programs --  
653 |a Computer programming 
653 |a Artificial Intelligence 
653 |a Programming languages (Electronic computers) 
653 |a Artificial intelligence 
653 |a Programming Techniques 
653 |a Programming Languages, Compilers, Interpreters 
700 1 |a Mellish, Christopher S.  |e [author] 
710 2 |a SpringerLink (Online service) 
041 0 7 |a eng  |2 ISO 639-2 
989 |b SBA  |a Springer Book Archives -2004 
856 |u https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-97005-4?nosfx=y  |x Verlag  |3 Volltext 
082 0 |a 005.13 
520 |a We have added new material to Chapter 3 to give an account of up-to-date programming techniques using accumulators and difference structures. Chapter 8 contains some new information on syntax errors. Operator precedences are now compatible with the most widely-used implementations. We have made further reorganisations and improvements in presentation, and have corrected a number of minor errors. We thank the many people who brought typographical errors in the previous edition to our attention, and we thank A.R.C. for careful proofreading. Cambridge, England W.F.C. January,1987 C.S.M. PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION (1984) Since the first publishing of Programming in Prolog in 1981, Prolog has continued to attract an unexpectedly great deal of interest in the computer science community and is now seen as a potential basis for an important new generation of programming languages and systems. We hope that Programming in Prolog has partially satisfied the increasing need for an easy, yet comprehensive introduction to the language as a tool for practical programming. In this second edition we have taken the opportunity to improve the presentation and to correct various minor errors in the original. We thank the many people who have given us suggestions for corrections and improvement. Cambridge, England W.F.C.