The Kidney and Hypertension in Diabetes Mellitus

The sum of clinical problems caused by diabetic renal disease has been steadily increasing since the first edition of this book was published in 1988. The years since have seen tremendous progress in research activities. Importantly, this also includes improvement in the treatment programs to preven...

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Main Author: Mogensen, Carl Erik
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Boston, MA Springer US 1994, 1994
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Summary:The sum of clinical problems caused by diabetic renal disease has been steadily increasing since the first edition of this book was published in 1988. The years since have seen tremendous progress in research activities. Importantly, this also includes improvement in the treatment programs to prevent end-stage renal failure. It has become clear that the diabetic kidney is extremely pressure-sensitive, responding to effective antihypertensive treatment by retarded progression of disease. Some agents may be more beneficial in this respect than others, although effective blood pressure reduction per se is crucial throughout the stages of diabetic renal disease. However, the prime cause of diabetic renal disease is related to poor metabolic control and it is now documented beyond doubt that good metabolic control is able to postpone or perhaps even prevent the development of renal disease. However, in many individuals we are not able to provide such a quality of control that will prevent complications, and therefore non-glycaemic intervention remains important. Maybe in the future non-glycaemic intervention will become the most important research area in diabetic nephropathy. Much information is now available on the exact mechanisms behind poor metabolic control and development of renal disease. It is likely that a combination of genetic predisposition and metabolic and haemodynamic abnormalities explain the progression to renal disease, seen in about 30% of diabetic individuals. Much of this development probably relates to modifiable genetic factors, such as blood pressure elevation or haemodynamic aberrations. However, mechanisms related to the response to hyperglycaemia are also of clear importance, as is the possibility that these metabolic or haemodynamic pathways may be inhibited. This volume reviews older data as well as the progress seen within the research on diabetic nephropathy over the last five years and describes the state of the art of the development
Physical Description:XXVI, 547 p online resource
ISBN:9781475767469