Mathematical Analysis : An Introduction

This is a textbook suitable for a year-long course in analysis at the ad­ vanced undergraduate or possibly beginning-graduate level. It is intended for students with a strong background in calculus and linear algebra, and a strong motivation to learn mathematics for its own sake. At this stage of th...

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Main Author: Browder, Andrew
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: New York, NY Springer New York 1996, 1996
Edition:1st ed. 1996
Series:Undergraduate Texts in Mathematics
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Summary:This is a textbook suitable for a year-long course in analysis at the ad­ vanced undergraduate or possibly beginning-graduate level. It is intended for students with a strong background in calculus and linear algebra, and a strong motivation to learn mathematics for its own sake. At this stage of their education, such students are generally given a course in abstract algebra, and a course in analysis, which give the fundamentals of these two areas, as mathematicians today conceive them. Mathematics is now a subject splintered into many specialties and sub­ specialties, but most of it can be placed roughly into three categories: al­ gebra, geometry, and analysis. In fact, almost all mathematics done today is a mixture of algebra, geometry and analysis, and some of the most in­ teresting results are obtained by the application of analysis to algebra, say, or geometry to analysis, in a fresh and surprising way. What then do these categories signify? Algebra is the mathematics that arises from the ancient experiences of addition and multiplication of whole numbers; it deals with the finite and discrete. Geometry is the mathematics that grows out of spatial experience; it is concerned with shape and form, and with measur­ ing, where algebra deals with counting
Physical Description:XIV, 335 p online resource
ISBN:9781461207153