NASA's Scientist-Astronauts

Mounting pressure in the early 1960s from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to study ways of expanding the role of astronauts to conduct science on future space missions led to NASA’s conclusion that flying scientifically trained crewmembers would generate greater returns from each mission. NAS...

Full description

Main Authors: David, Shayler, Burgess, Colin (Author)
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: New York, NY Springer New York 2007, 2007
Edition:1st ed. 2007
Series:Space Exploration
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer eBooks 2005- - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
LEADER 02969nmm a2200361 u 4500
001 EB000355491
003 EBX01000000000000000208543
005 00000000000000.0
007 cr|||||||||||||||||||||
008 130626 ||| eng
020 |a 9780387493879 
100 1 |a David, Shayler 
245 0 0 |a NASA's Scientist-Astronauts  |h Elektronische Ressource  |c by Shayler David, Colin Burgess 
250 |a 1st ed. 2007 
260 |a New York, NY  |b Springer New York  |c 2007, 2007 
300 |a XLV, 543 p  |b online resource 
505 0 |a The Wrong Stuff -- Scientists as Astronauts -- The Scientific Six -- School for Scientists -- The Excess Eleven -- “Flying Is Just Not My Cup of Tea” -- A Geologist on the Moon -- Laboratories in the Sky -- Shuttling into Space -- The Long Wait -- Ending of Eras -- Science Officers on ISS. 
653 |a Astronautics 
653 |a Popular Science in Astronomy 
653 |a Astronomy, Observations and Techniques 
653 |a Aerospace Technology and Astronautics 
653 |a Astrophysics 
653 |a Astronomy 
653 |a Space Sciences (including Extraterrestrial Physics, Space Exploration and Astronautics) 
700 1 |a Burgess, Colin  |e [author] 
710 2 |a SpringerLink (Online service) 
041 0 7 |a eng  |2 ISO 639-2 
989 |b Springer  |a Springer eBooks 2005- 
490 0 |a Space Exploration 
856 |u https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-49387-9?nosfx=y  |x Verlag  |3 Volltext 
082 0 |a 520 
520 |a Mounting pressure in the early 1960s from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to study ways of expanding the role of astronauts to conduct science on future space missions led to NASA’s conclusion that flying scientifically trained crewmembers would generate greater returns from each mission. NASA and industry studies continued investigating possibilities that could lead to the eventual creation of the first space stations using surplus Apollo hardware, through the Apollo Applications Programme (AAP). There was also a growing interest within the military to create their own manned space station programme, conducting on-orbit experiments and research with strategic advantages for national security. In October 1964 the Soviets launched Voskhod 1 whose 3-man crew were identified as the first ‘scientific passengers’ in space. A few days later NASA and the NAS had completed joint studies into the possibility of using scientists in the manned space programme, and invited scientists to apply for astronaut training. In selecting the first group of scientist-astronauts, NASA had one firm requirement; any person accepted into the programme would have to qualify as a military jet pilot. While the second group of scientists were completing their academic, survival and flight training programme, the remaining members of the first scientist-astronaut group were involved in supporting the developing Apollo Applications programme and the Apollo lunar programme