John Marshall

John James Marshall (September 24, 1755 – July 6, 1835) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the fourth Chief Justice of the United States from 1801 to 1835. Marshall remains the longest-serving chief justice and fourth-longest serving justice in Supreme Court history, and he is widely regarded as one of the most influential justices to ever sit on the Supreme Court. Prior to joining the Supreme Court, Marshall served as the United States Secretary of State under President John Adams.

Marshall was born in Fauquier County, Virginia in 1755. After the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War, he joined the Continental Army, serving in numerous battles. During the later stages of the war, he was admitted to the state bar and won election to the Virginia House of Delegates. Marshall favored the ratification of the United States Constitution, and he played a major role in Virginia's ratification of that document. At the request of President Adams, Marshall traveled to France in 1797 to help bring an end to attacks on American shipping. In what became known as the XYZ Affair, the government of France refused to open negotiations unless the United States agreed to pay bribes. After returning to the United States, Marshall won election to the United States House of Representatives and emerged as a leader of the Federalist Party in Congress. He was appointed secretary of state in 1800 after a cabinet shake-up, becoming an important figure in the Adams administration.

In 1801, Adams appointed Marshall to the Supreme Court. Marshall quickly emerged as the key figure on the court, due in large part to his personal influence with the other justices. Under his leadership, the court moved away from seriatim opinions, instead issuing a single majority opinion that elucidated a clear rule. The 1803 case of ''Marbury v. Madison'' presented the first major case heard by the Marshall Court. In his opinion for the court, Marshall upheld the principle of judicial review, whereby courts could strike down federal and state laws if they conflicted with the Constitution. Marshall's holding avoided direct conflict with the executive branch, which was led by Democratic-Republican President Thomas Jefferson. By establishing the principle of judicial review while avoiding an inter-branch confrontation, Marshall helped cement the position of the American judiciary as an independent and co-equal branch of government.

After 1803, many of the major decisions issued by the Marshall Court confirmed the supremacy of the federal government and the federal Constitution over the states. In ''Fletcher v. Peck'' and ''Dartmouth College v. Woodward'', the court invalidated state actions because they violated the Contract Clause. The court's decision in ''McCulloch v. Maryland'' upheld the constitutionality of the Second Bank of the United States and established the principle that the states could not tax federal institutions. The cases of ''Martin v. Hunter's Lessee'' and ''Cohens v. Virginia'' established that the Supreme Court could hear appeals from state courts in both civil and criminal matters. Marshall's opinion in ''Gibbons v. Ogden'' established that the Commerce Clause bars states from restricting navigation. In the case of ''Worcester v. Georgia'', Marshall held that the federal government had the sole power to deal with Native Americans, and he ordered the release of prisoners held by the state of Georgia. President Andrew Jackson refused to enforce the order, but his administration avoided a confrontation with the Marshall Court by arranging for the pardon of the prisoners. Marshall died in 1835, and Jackson appointed Roger Taney as his successor. Provided by Wikipedia

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by Marshall, John
Published 1973
Documentary Educational Resources (DER)

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by Marshall, John
Published 1973
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by Marshall, John
Published 1973
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by Marshall, John
Published 1973
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by Marshall, John
Published 1973
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by Marshall, John
Published 2005
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by Marshall, John
Published 2002
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by Marshall, John
Published 1973
Documentary Educational Resources (DER)

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by Marshall, John
Published 1973
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by Marshall, John
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by Marshall, John
Published 2007
Documentary Educational Resources, Inc.

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by Marshall, John
Published 1972
Documentary Educational Resources, Inc.

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by Marshall, John
Published 1973
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by Marshall, John
Published 1995
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by Marshall, John
Published 1975
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by Marshall, John
Published 2009
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by Marshall, John
Published 1974
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by Marshall, John
Published 2009
Documentary Educational Resources (DER)

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by Marshall, John
Published 2009
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by Marshall, John
Published 1969
Documentary Educational Resources (DER)