Stefan Homburg

Stefan Homburg (born March 10, 1961) is a German professor of economics. He was the director of the Institute of Public Finance at the University of Hannover, Lower Saxony, Germany until 2021. Outside academia he is best known for his controversial statements regarding the COVID-19 pandemic.

Homburg studied economics, philosophy, and mathematics at the Cologne University, where he graduated with a degree in economics in 1985, followed by a doctoral degree in 1987. Subsequently, he was Professor of Economics at University of Bonn and University of Magdeburg, before he moved to Hannover.

Homburg's research focuses on macroeconomics and public finance. He has co-authored a textbook in macroeconomics. Other publications address topics in monetary policy, social security, tax law, and business taxation.

Homburg served as a member of several policy committees, including the Advisory Council at the Federal Ministry of Finance, the Federal Constitutional Commission (''Bundesstaatskommission''), and the Federal Government's Council for Sustainable Developments (''RNE''). Between 1999 and 2007, he acted as Dean of Hannover's School of Economics and Management. From 1996 until 2003, he was editor of journals of the German Economic Association (''Verein für Socialpolitik'').

In 2020 Homburg voiced criticism of the German government's response to COVID-19 on Twitter, YouTube, and in opinion pieces for the newspaper Die Welt. In April 2020 he argued against a lockdown in Germany and incorrectly predicted a little more than 3,000 COVID-19 related deaths in Germany. Homburg has claimed without proof that there will be involuntary COVID-19 vaccinations in Germany and stated that the Robert Koch Institute's statistics regarding the COVID-19 epidemic in Germany are "all lies". Several economists, statisticians, and other academics have criticised Homburg's analysis as sloppy and methodologically flawed. Homburg has repeatedly compared the German government's COVID-19 containment measures to fascism and the rise of the Nazis in 1933, which sparked public criticism. The University of Hannover has called this comparison "intolerable" and has distanced itself from Homburg. Provided by Wikipedia

1
by Homburg, Stefan
Published 1992
Springer Berlin Heidelberg

2
by Homburg, Stefan
Published 1988
Springer Berlin Heidelberg

3
by Homburg, Stefan
Published 1997
Duncker & Humblot

4
by Felderer, Bernhard, Homburg, Stefan
Published 1994
Springer Berlin Heidelberg

5
by Felderer, Bernhard, Homburg, Stefan
Published 1989
Springer Berlin Heidelberg

6
by Felderer, Bernhard, Homburg, Stefan
Published 1987
Springer Berlin Heidelberg

7
by Felderer, Bernhard, Homburg, Stefan
Published 1985
Springer Berlin Heidelberg

8
by Felderer, Bernhard, Homburg, Stefan
Published 2003
Springer Berlin Heidelberg

9
by Felderer, Bernhard, Homburg, Stefan
Published 1991
Springer Berlin Heidelberg

10
by Felderer, Bernhard, Homburg, Stefan
Published 1999
Springer Berlin Heidelberg

11
by Felderer, Bernhard, Homburg, Stefan
Published 1993
Springer Berlin Heidelberg

12
by Felderer, Bernhard, Homburg, Stefan
Published 1989
Springer Berlin Heidelberg

13
by Breyer, Friedrich, Franz, Wolfgang, Homburg, Stefan, Schnabel, Reinhold
Published 2004
Springer Berlin Heidelberg