Adam

|feast_day = 24 December (Catholic Church) Sunday of the Holy Forefathers (Eastern Orthodox Church) |venerated_in = Christianity
Islam
Druze
Baháʼí Faith
Mandaeism |image= File:Monreale adam entering.jpg |imagesize= |caption= A Byzantine mosaic in Monreale depicting Adam encountering the pre-incarnate Jesus at the Garden of Eden |birth_place = Garden of Eden |death_place= |titles = The Patriarch |attributes= |patronage = Gardeners and tailors |issues= |prayer= |prayer_attrib= }}

Adam|ʾAdam|ʾĀḏām}}; Aramaic: ܐܕܡ; ; ; }} is the name given in Genesis 1–5 to the first human. Adam is the first human-being aware of God, and features as such in various belief systems (including Judaism, Gnosticism, Christianity, and Islam).

According to Christianity, Adam sinned in the Garden of Eden by eating from the Tree of Knowledge. This action introduced death and sin into the world. This sinful nature infected all his descendants, and led humanity to be expelled from the Garden. Only through the Crucifixion of Jesus, humanity can be redeemed.

In Islam, Adam is considered ''Khalifa'' (خليفة) (successor) on earth. This is understood to mean either that he is God's deputy, the initiation of a new cycle of sentient life on earth, or both. Similar to the account in the Bible, according to the Quran, Adam is placed in a Garden. Tempted by the Tree of Immortality, he sins and loses his abode in the Garden. When Adam repents from his sin, he is forgiven by God. This is seen as a guidance for human-life, who sin, become aware of their mistake, and repent.

In Gnostic belief-systems, the bodily creation of Adam is viewed in a negative light. Due to the underlying demonization of matter, Gnostic cosmologies depict the body as a form of prison of Adam's soul. This soul would have been transferred by Sophia (wisdom) onto the creator (Demiurge) of the material world, who in turn is tricked into blowing the soul into a body.

The Book of Genesis, long believed to have been authored by Moses, is now interpreted by modern scholars as containing a creation narrative that derived from ancient origin myths. In biological terms, the terms Y-chromosomal Adam and Mitochondrial Eve refer to the most recent common ancestors traced through genetic markers, despite not representing a singular couple contemporaneous with the biblical account. Provided by Wikipedia

1
by Adam
Published 1950
Alexander Street Press Harvard University Press

2
by Adam
Published 1950
Alexander Street Press Harvard University Press

3
by Adam
Published 1950
Alexander Street Press Harvard University Press

4
by Adam
Published 1950
Alexander Street Press Harvard University Press

5
by Adam
Published 1972
Fink

7
by Fitz-Adam, Adam
Published 1782
printed for J. Dodsley, in Pall-Mall

8
by Fitz-Adam, Adam
Published 1772
printed for J. Dodsley, in Pall-Mall

9
by Fitz-Adam, Adam
Published 1793
printed for Silvester Doig

10
by Fitz-Adam, Adam
Published 1770
printed for S. Crowder, C. Ware, and T. Payne

11
by Fitz-Adam, Adam
Published 1756
printed by George Faulkner, in Essex-street

12
by Fitz-Adam, Adam
Published 1774
printed for Alexander Donaldson. Sold at his shops, No. 48, east corner of St. Paul'[s] Church-yard, London: and at Edinburgh

13
by Fitz-Adam, Adam
Published 1770
Printed by and for Martin & Wotherspoon

14
by Fitz-Adam, Adam
Published 1767
printed for J. Dodsley

15
by Fitz-Adam, Adam
Published 1776
at the Apollo Press, by the Martins

16
by Fitz-Adam, Adam
Published 1761
printed for R. and J. Dodsley, in Pall-Mall

17
by Fitz-Adam, Adam
Published 1755
printed for R. and J. Dodsley, in Pall-Mall

18
by Fitz-Adam, Adam
Published 1755
printed by George Faulkner, in Essex-Street

19
by Fitz-Adam, Adam
Published 1794
printed for J. Parsons, No. 21, Paternoster-Row

20
by Fitz-Adam, Adam
Published 1763
printed for R. and J. Dodsley, in Pall-Mall