Gender and Employment in the COVID-19 Recession: Evidence on “She-cessions”

Early evidence on the pandemic’s effects pointed to women’s employment falling disproportionately, leading observers to call a “she-cession.” This paper documents the extent and persistence of this phenomenon in a quarterly sample of 38 advanced and emerging market economies. We show that there is a...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Bluedorn, John
Other Authors: Caselli, Francesca, Hansen, Niels-Jakob, Shibata, Ippei
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Washington, D.C. International Monetary Fund 2021
Series:IMF Working Papers
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: International Monetary Fund - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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245 0 0 |a Gender and Employment in the COVID-19 Recession: Evidence on “She-cessions”  |c John Bluedorn, Francesca Caselli, Niels-Jakob Hansen, Ippei Shibata, Marina Mendes Tavares 
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300 |a 24 pages 
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653 |a Social discrimination & equal treatment 
653 |a Women 
653 |a Infectious & contagious diseases 
653 |a Gender studies; women & girls 
653 |a Labour; income economics 
653 |a Employment; Economic theory 
653 |a Labor markets 
653 |a Aggregate Labor Productivity 
653 |a Gender studies, gender groups 
653 |a Labor 
653 |a Economics of specific sectors 
653 |a Sex discrimination 
653 |a Currency crises 
653 |a Cycles 
653 |a International Economics 
653 |a Gender Studies 
653 |a Macroeconomics 
653 |a Diseases: Contagious 
653 |a Communicable diseases 
653 |a Employment rate 
653 |a Women''s Studies' 
653 |a Employment 
653 |a Economic & financial crises & disasters 
653 |a Mobility, Unemployment, and Vacancies: General 
653 |a Gender inequality 
653 |a Economics of Gender 
653 |a Non-labor Discrimination 
653 |a Economics: General 
653 |a Unemployment 
653 |a Informal sector; Economics 
653 |a Demand and Supply of Labor: General 
653 |a Aggregate Human Capital 
653 |a Health Behavior 
653 |a Labor market 
653 |a Wages 
653 |a Business Fluctuations 
653 |a Intergenerational Income Distribution 
653 |a Gender 
700 1 |a Caselli, Francesca 
700 1 |a Hansen, Niels-Jakob 
700 1 |a Shibata, Ippei 
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520 |a Early evidence on the pandemic’s effects pointed to women’s employment falling disproportionately, leading observers to call a “she-cession.” This paper documents the extent and persistence of this phenomenon in a quarterly sample of 38 advanced and emerging market economies. We show that there is a large degree of heterogeneity across countries, with over half to two-thirds exhibiting larger declines in women’s than men’s employment rates. These gender differences in COVID-19’s effects are typically short-lived, lasting only a quarter or two on average. We also show that she-cessions are strongly related to COVID-19’s impacts on gender shares in employment within sectors