Platelet-rich plasma for wound care in the Medicare population

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in individuals with lower extremity diabetic ulcers, lower extremity venous ulcers, and pressure ulcers. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Registrar of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Qu, Wenchun
Corporate Authors: United States Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Mayo Clinic Evidence-based Practice Center, Technology Assessment Program (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Rockville, MD Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality 2020, September 17, 2020
Series:Technology assessment
Online Access:
Collection: National Center for Biotechnology Information - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Description
Summary:OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in individuals with lower extremity diabetic ulcers, lower extremity venous ulcers, and pressure ulcers. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Registrar of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PsycINFO, Scopus and various grey literature sources from database inception to June 11, 2020. REVIEW METHODS: We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and comparative observational studies that compared PRP to any other wound care without PRP in adult patients. Pairs of independent reviewers selected and appraised studies. Meta-analysis was conducted when appropriate and the strength of evidence (SOE) was determined based on a priori plan. RESULTS: We included 27 studies (22 randomized, 5 comparative observational studies, total of 1,796 patients).
No significant changes were found in terms of wound infection, amputation, wound recurrence, or hospitalization. In patients with lower extremity venous ulcers, the SOE was insufficient to estimate an effect on critical outcomes, such as complete wound closure or time to complete wound closure. Similarly, evidence was insufficient to estimate an effect on any outcome in pressure ulcers. There was no statistically significant difference in death, total adverse events or serious adverse events between PRP and management without PRP. CONCLUSIONS: Autologous platelet-rich plasma based on moderate SOE increases complete wound closure or healing, and low SOE shortens healing time and reduces wound size in individuals with lower extremity diabetic ulcers. The evidence is insufficient to estimate an effect of autologous platelet-rich plasma on wound healing in individuals with lower extremity venous ulcers or pressure ulcers
15 studies enrolled patients with lower extremity diabetic ulcers, 11 enrolled patients with lower extremity venous ulcers, and 2 enrolled patients with pressure ulcers in any location. Followup after intervention ranged from no followup to 11 months. The available studies suffered from important limitations, such as inadequate description of offloading and wound care procedures, wound characteristics, platelet-rich plasma formulation techniques, concentration and volume; inadequate length of followup; and lack of stratification by comorbidities and other patient characteristics including older adults. Compared with management without PRP, PRP therapy increased complete wound closure or healing in lower extremity diabetic ulcers (RR: 1.20; 95% CI: 1.09 to 1.32, moderate SOE), shortened the time to complete wound closure, and reduced wound area and depth (low SOE), although Medicare-eligible older adults were underrepresented in the included studies.
Item Description:"Project ID: MYO359"
Physical Description:1 PDF file (various pagings) illustrations