Horizon scan of invasive interventions for lower extremity peripheral artery disease and systematic review of studies comparing stent placement to other interventions

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has requested a technology assessment report from The Technology Assessment Program (TAP) at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) on invasive interventions to treat occlusive lesions related to PAD, focusing primarily on periphera...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Authors: Balk, Ethan, Cepeda, M. Soledad (Author), Ip, Stanley (Author), Trikalinos, Thomas A. (Author)
Corporate Authors: Technology Assessment Program (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality), Tufts Evidence-based Practice Center
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Rockville, Maryland Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Technology Assessment Program 2008, 2008
Series:Technology assessment report
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: National Center for Biotechnology Information - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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100 1 |a Balk, Ethan 
245 0 0 |a Horizon scan of invasive interventions for lower extremity peripheral artery disease and systematic review of studies comparing stent placement to other interventions  |h Elektronische Ressource  |c Ethan Balk, M. Soledad Cepeda, Stanley Ip, Thomas Trikalinos, Thomas O'Donnell 
260 |a Rockville, Maryland  |b Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Technology Assessment Program  |c 2008, 2008 
300 |a 1 PDF file (157 pages)  |b illustrations 
505 0 |a Includes bibliographical references 
653 |a Stents 
653 |a Vascular Surgical Procedures 
653 |a Lower Extremity / blood supply 
653 |a Peripheral Arterial Disease / surgery 
653 |a Treatment Outcome 
700 1 |a Cepeda, M. Soledad  |e [author] 
700 1 |a Ip, Stanley  |e [author] 
700 1 |a Trikalinos, Thomas A.  |e [author] 
710 2 |a Technology Assessment Program (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) 
710 2 |a Tufts Evidence-based Practice Center 
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989 |b NCBI  |a National Center for Biotechnology Information 
490 0 |a Technology assessment report 
500 |a Title from PDF t.p. - "October 10, 2008." 
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520 |a The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has requested a technology assessment report from The Technology Assessment Program (TAP) at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) on invasive interventions to treat occlusive lesions related to PAD, focusing primarily on peripheral artery angioplasty with stent placement. For this topic, CMS is primarily interested in clinical outcomes, in contradistinction to the most commonly researched outcome in the field of PAD, artery patency. AHRQ assigned this report to the following Evidence-based Practice Center: Tufts Evidence-based Practice Center (Contract No. HHSA-290-2007-10055-1-EPC3) 
520 |a These latter procedures include percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (where the vessel lumen is expanded at the site of the occlusion with a balloon), balloon-expandable stents (which are left in place to support the opened lumen), and more recently self-expanding stents, in addition to other less commonly used interventions or cointerventions such as brachytherapy, cryotherapy, drug-eluting stents, and atherectomy. In 2007, the Transatlantic Intersociety Consensus (TASC) Committee updated a consensus document on managing lower extremity PAD. TASC II updated a classification scheme for the disease based on anatomy of the disease and the extent of lesions. Treatment recommendations were established for the four classifications (A to D). The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) also published recommendations in 2006 based on clinical symptoms and anatomic level of disease.  
520 |a About 12 million people in the United States have peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and it is increasing in frequency. In the lower extremities, PAD affects three major arterial segments: aorto-iliac arteries, femoral popliteal arteries, and infrapopliteal (primarily tibial) arteries. The disease is commonly classified clinically based on claudication, rest pain, or degree of tissue loss due to chronic ischemia. Treatment is based on lifestyle changes, including exercise, and medications to improve blood flow. Patients with more severe clinical disease often require invasive interventions aimed at reestablishing bloodflow to the affected limbs. Invasive treatment options include open surgery of the lower extremity with either autogenous or synthetic grafts to bypass the arterial occlusion(s), endarterectomy, and catheter-based endovascular procedures.