Integrating health system data with systematic reviews a framework for when and how unpublished health system data can be used with systematic reviews to support health system decision making

Systematic reviews are an important and necessary source of information to improve healthcare delivery; however, reviews of the existing research are often insufficient to address the decision-making needs of health systems. Incorporating data from health systems into traditional systematic reviews...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Lin, Jennifer
Corporate Authors: United States Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Oregon Evidence-based Practice Center (Center for Health Research (Kaiser-Permanente Medical Care Program. Northwest Region)), Mayo Clinic Evidence-based Practice Center, ECRI Institute-Penn Medicine Evidence-based Practice Center, Oregon Health & Science University Pacific Northwest Evidence-based Practice Center
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Rockville, MD Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 2020, April 2020
Series:Methods research report
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Collection: National Center for Biotechnology Information - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Description
Summary:Systematic reviews are an important and necessary source of information to improve healthcare delivery; however, reviews of the existing research are often insufficient to address the decision-making needs of health systems. Incorporating data from health systems into traditional systematic reviews may be one way to improve their utility. In this paper, we map out ways in which health system data can be used with systematic reviews, articulate the scenarios for when health system data may be most helpful to use alongside systematic reviews (i.e., to improve the strength of evidence, to improve the applicability of evidence, and to improve the implementation of evidence), and discuss the importance of framing the limitations and considerations when using unpublished health system data in reviews (i.e., critical appraisal to understand the study design biases as well as limitations in information and data quality). To develop this framework, we used examples identified through literature searches and affiliations with four health systems that have the ability to use both internal and external evidence to support their clinical operations. Finally, we also offer recommendations to systematic reviewers who choose to integrate health system data and possible next steps in developing processes and capacity to routinely conduct this type of work
Physical Description:1 PDF file (vii, 18, A1 pages) illustrations