Peripheral arterial disease diagnosis and treatment : a systematic review : summary and conclusions

PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL DISEASE IS COMMON, PARTICULARLY IN THE ELDERLY, AND POSES A HIGH RISK OF LONG-TERM SUFFERING, AMPUTATION AND PREMATURE DEATH: Peripheral arterial disease is the result of ischaemia (insufficient blood flow) in the lower extremities. In the great majority of cases, the cause is at...

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Bibliographic Details
Corporate Author: Statens beredning för medicinsk utvärdering (Sweden)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Stockholm Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment (SBU) 2008, 2008
Series:SBU yellow report
Subjects:
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Collection: National Center for Biotechnology Information - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Description
Summary:PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL DISEASE IS COMMON, PARTICULARLY IN THE ELDERLY, AND POSES A HIGH RISK OF LONG-TERM SUFFERING, AMPUTATION AND PREMATURE DEATH: Peripheral arterial disease is the result of ischaemia (insufficient blood flow) in the lower extremities. In the great majority of cases, the cause is atherosclerosis - which is among the most common diseases and one that rarely affects the blood vessels of the lower extremities alone, but rather the entire cardiovascular system. Thus, all patients who have symptoms of peripheral arterial disease should be assessed for risk of atherosclerosis. Peripheral arterial disease in its mild form may be limited to intermittent claudication, pain in the lower extremities that is triggered by exertion but that ceases during rest. When ischaemia is chronic, critical or acute - characterised by stenosed or occluded blood vessels - peripheral arterial disease increases the risk of tissue death (gangrene), amputation and premature death. Because atherosclerosis - the primary cause of peripheral arterial disease - can progress for a long time without producing any direct symptoms, the number of people who have the disease is unknown. The risk increases with age, and peripheral arterial disease occurs among an estimated 10% of people over 60 years. Half (more than 5,000) of the invasive procedures that are performed every year at Swedish hospitals for vascular diseases seek to restore blood flow in patients with various forms of peripheral arterial disease. RESEARCH NEEDS: Multicentre randomised trials could be arranged in Sweden to address two key questions:1. Which therapy is better for intermittent claudication - intervention or walking training and best medical treatment?2. Which therapy is better for critical limb ischaemia - surgical/endovascular intervention or best medical treatment?
Physical Description:1 PDF file (38 pages) illustrations
ISBN:9879185413201