Pharmacotherapy for stimulant use disorders a systematic review

Stimulant use disorders, specifically cocaine and methamphetamine use, present ongoing public health problems in the United States, with major medical, psychiatric, cognitive, socioeconomic, and legal consequences. Currently there are no accepted FDA-approved pharmacotherapy treatment options availa...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Chan, Brian
Corporate Authors: Portland VA Medical Center Evidence-based Synthesis Program Center, Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (U.S.), United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Washington, DC Department of Veterans Affairs, Health Services Research & Development Service 2018, August 2018
Series:Evidence-based synthesis program
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: National Center for Biotechnology Information - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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245 0 0 |a Pharmacotherapy for stimulant use disorders  |h Elektronische Ressource  |b a systematic review  |c principal investigator: Brian Chan ; co-investigators: Karli Kondo, Chelsea Ayers, Michele Freeman, Jessica Montgomery, Robin Paynter, Devan Kansagara 
260 |a Washington, DC  |b Department of Veterans Affairs, Health Services Research & Development Service  |c 2018, August 2018 
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653 |a Amphetamine-Related Disorders / drug therapy 
653 |a United States 
653 |a Clinical Trials as Topic 
653 |a Cocaine-Related Disorders / drug therapy 
653 |a Risk Assessment 
710 2 |a Portland VA Medical Center  |b Evidence-based Synthesis Program Center 
710 2 |a Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (U.S.) 
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520 |a Stimulant use disorders, specifically cocaine and methamphetamine use, present ongoing public health problems in the United States, with major medical, psychiatric, cognitive, socioeconomic, and legal consequences. Currently there are no accepted FDA-approved pharmacotherapy treatment options available for cocaine or methamphetamine use disorders. Several pharmacotherapies have been proposed as possible experimental interventions to promote reduction in use or cessation. Currently, psychotherapy (including cognitive behavioral therapy, drug counseling, relapse prevention, etc) is offered as the primary treatment for stimulant addiction. In addition, contingency management strategies use incentives to increase engagement in treatment and reduce drug use. In order to guide future research and policy decisions for the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), the Office of Mental Health and the Seattle and Philadelphia Centers for Substance Abuse Treatment & Education (CESATE) asked the Veterans Affairs Evidence-based Synthesis Program (ESP) to provide an up-to-date examination of the benefits and risks of various pharmacologic treatments of stimulant use disorder. Specifically, this review examined (1) the benefits and harms of pharmacotherapy for cocaine use disorder, (2) subpopulations for whom different forms of pharmacotherapy are most/least effective for cocaine use disorder, (3) the benefits and harms of pharmacotherapy for amphetamine/methamphetamine use disorder, and (4) subpopulations for whom different forms of pharmacotherapy are most/least effective for amphetamine/methamphetamine use disorder