Strength testing in the Air Force current processes and suggestions for improvements

Since 1987, the Air Force has used the Strength Aptitude Test (SAT), a test of physical strength that uses the incremental lift machine, to screen and classify enlisted personnel into career specialties. In this study RAND evaluated the usefulness, validity, and fairness of the SAT--something not do...

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Main Authors: Sims, Carra S., Hardison, Chaitra M. (Author), Lytell, Maria C. (Author), Robyn, Abby Eisenshtat (Author)
Corporate Authors: Rand Corporation, Project Air Force (U.S.), United States Air Force
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Santa Monica, Calif. RAND Corporation [2014]©2014, 2014
Series:Research report
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: JSTOR Open Access Books - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Summary:Since 1987, the Air Force has used the Strength Aptitude Test (SAT), a test of physical strength that uses the incremental lift machine, to screen and classify enlisted personnel into career specialties. In this study RAND evaluated the usefulness, validity, and fairness of the SAT--something not done for more than two decades. RAND's research focused on two areas. The first area was implementation of the SAT at military entrance processing stations. The researchers observed that SAT administration, while fairly consistent, could be improved: SAT machines need to be inventoried on a regular basis to identify and repair damage; a standardized training procedure is needed for all test administrators; and recruits need to be fully informed prior to taking the test as to its purpose and the value of preparation. The second area was the process for setting strength requirements for career fields. The researchers concluded that the method of collecting physical requirements information might be deficient because it involves only limited input. As an alternative, they developed and tested an online survey tool for defining strength requirements. The survey asked respondents in eight Air Force Specialties to describe aspects of the job's physical requirements that are vital for defining strength requirements. Analysis of the data collected validates the potential effectiveness of the survey, and the researchers suggest it can be used in conjunction with the Air Force's existing occupational analysis survey. Further, they recommend the Air Force establish a new method for calculating SAT scores
Item Description:"RAND Project Air Force.". - "Prepared for the United States Air Force."
Physical Description:xx, 112 pages illustrations
ISBN:9780833084354
0833084356