Chinese Engagement in Africa : Drivers, Reactions, and Implications for U.S. Policy

"Most analyses of Chinese engagement in Africa focus either on what China gets out of these partnerships or the impacts that China's aid and investment have had on African countries. This analysis approaches Sino-African relations as a vibrant, two-way dynamic in which both sides adjust to...

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Main Authors: Hanauer, Larry, Morris, Lyle J. (Author)
Corporate Authors: Rand Corporation, Rand Corporation National Security Research Division
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Santa Monica, CA RAND Corporation [2014]©2014, 2014
Series:RAND Corporation research report series
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: JSTOR Open Access Books - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Summary:"Most analyses of Chinese engagement in Africa focus either on what China gets out of these partnerships or the impacts that China's aid and investment have had on African countries. This analysis approaches Sino-African relations as a vibrant, two-way dynamic in which both sides adjust to policy initiatives and popular perceptions emanating from the other. The authors focus on (1) Chinese and African objectives in the political and economic spheres and how they work to achieve them, (2) African perceptions of Chinese engagement, (3) how China has adjusted its policies to accommodate often-hostile African responses, and (4) whether the United States and China are competing for influence, access, and resources in Africa and how they might cooperate in the region. The authors find that Chinese engagement in the region is primarily concerned with natural resource extraction, infrastructure development, and manufacturing, in contrast to the United States' focus on higher-technology trade and services as well as aid policies aimed at promoting democracy, good governance, and human development. African governments generally welcome engagement with China, as it brings them political legitimacy and contributes to their economic development. Some segments of African society criticize Chinese enterprises for their poor labor conditions, unsustainable environmental practices, and job displacement, but China has been modifying its approach to the continent to address these concerns. China and the United States are not strategic rivals in Africa, but greater American commercial engagement in African markets could generate competition that would both benefit African countries and advance U.S. interests."--Back cover
Item Description:"RAND Corporation research report series."--Web page (PDF). - "RR-521-OSD."--Page 4 of printed paper wrapper. - "National Security Research Division.". - "This research was conducted within the International Security and Defense Policy Center of the RAND National Defense Research Institute."--Title page verso. - "Approved for public release; distribution unlimited."
Physical Description:xvii, 151 pages
ISBN:0833084119
9780833084125
0833084127
9780833084118