The option of an oil tax to fund transportation and infrastructure

This paper discusses using an oil tax to fund U.S. transportation infrastructure. The paper discusses the pros and cons of an oil tax to take the place of the current gasoline and diesel taxes

Main Authors: Crane, Keith, Burger, Nicholas (Author), Wachs, Martin (Author)
Corporate Author: Rand Corporation
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Santa Monica, CA RAND ©2011©2011, 2011
Series:Occasional paper
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: JSTOR Open Access Books - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
LEADER 02230nam a2200481 u 4500
001 EB001842704
003 EBX01000000000000001006693
005 00000000000000.0
007 tu|||||||||||||||||||||
008 180730 r ||| eng
020 |a 9781283135818 
020 |a 1283135817 
020 |z 9780833051783 
020 |a 9780833051783 
020 |z 0833051784 
020 |a 0833051784 
050 4 |a HD9560.8.U52 
100 1 |a Crane, Keith 
245 0 0 |a The option of an oil tax to fund transportation and infrastructure  |h Elektronische Ressource  |c Keith Crane, Nicholas Burger, Martin Wachs 
260 |a Santa Monica, CA  |b RAND  |c ©2011©2011, 2011 
300 |a xv, 31 pages  |b charts 
505 0 |a Introduction -- Why tax oil? -- How much might oil be taxed? -- Who would pay the tax? 
505 0 |a Includes bibliographical references (pages 29-31) 
651 4 |a United States 
653 |a Infrastructure (Economics) / Finance 
653 |a Transportation / Finance 
653 |a Petroleum / Taxation / Economic aspects 
653 |a BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Industries / Transportation 
653 |a BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / International / Taxation 
700 1 |a Burger, Nicholas  |e [author] 
700 1 |a Wachs, Martin  |e [author] 
710 2 |a Rand Corporation 
041 0 7 |a eng  |2 ISO 639-2 
989 |b ZDB-39-JOA  |a JSTOR Open Access Books 
490 0 |a Occasional paper 
024 8 |a RAND/OP-320-RC 
776 |z 0833051830 
776 |z 9780833051837 
856 |u https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/op320rc  |x Verlag  |3 Volltext 
082 0 |a 336.2/785532820973 
520 |a This paper discusses using an oil tax to fund U.S. transportation infrastructure. The paper discusses the pros and cons of an oil tax to take the place of the current gasoline and diesel taxes 
520 |a Federal spending on surface-transportation infrastructure outpaces federal taxes on gasoline and diesel fuel. Increasing fuel efficiency means that fuel-purchase expenditures have dropped, so real revenue generated from these taxes has declined. A percentage tax on crude oil and imported refined-petroleum products consumed in the United States could fund U.S. transportation infrastructure