Computerized cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with depressive or anxiety disorders

Given the high rates of mental illness among Veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, it is not surprising that the demand for mental health services in Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has increased 132 percent since 2006. The most commonly diagnosed and treated disorders among Veterans re...

Full description

Main Authors: Dedert, Eric, McDuffie, Jennifer R. (Author)
Corporate Authors: United States Department of Veterans Affairs, Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (U.S.), Durham VA Medical Center Evidence-based Synthesis Program Center
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Durham, N.C. Evidence-based Synthesis Program (ESP) Center, Durham Veterans Affairs Healthcare System October 2013, 2013
Series:Evidence-based synthesis program
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: National Center for Biotechnology Information - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Summary:Given the high rates of mental illness among Veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, it is not surprising that the demand for mental health services in Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has increased 132 percent since 2006. The most commonly diagnosed and treated disorders among Veterans receiving care at VHA include (1) PTSD, (2) depressive disorders, (3) episodic mood disorders, (4) anxiety disorders, and (5) substance use disorders. Unfortunately, shortages in trained mental health providers and logistical barriers limit Veterans' access to evidence-based therapies. To address the growing need and barriers to accessing mental health services, the VA/Department of Defense (DoD) developed the Integrated Mental Health Strategy (IMHS), which includes the development of a series of Web-based self-help programs. Because web-based programs can be accessed anonymously, anytime, anywhere, and by multiple Veterans simultaneously, these services have the potential to surmount stigma and geographical and financial barriers to accessing mental health treatment. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), using group or individual face-to-face therapy, is effective in treating mild to severe mental health symptoms. Computer-based self-help programs grounded in CBT (computerized CBT [cCBT]) have generally been shown to produce significant reductions in depressive and anxiety symptoms, but treatment effects vary across studies. The availability of support via email, instant messaging, or phone contact with a therapist may mitigate attrition and improve treatment outcomes. Still, it is unclear how support-related factors influence treatment response to cCBT programs. To support the development of cCBT self-help programs, the VA commissioned the Evidence-based Synthesis Program to conduct a systematic review of the literature
Item Description:Title from PDF title page
Physical Description:1 PDF file (iv, 103 pages) illustrations