Hand antisepsis procedures : a review of guidelines

Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) are considered an important public health problem. In a 2012 report by the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), it was estimated that 5% to 10% of patients hospitalized in Canada will develop a HAI. Pathogens (microorganisms) that cause HAIs can be transmitt...

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Main Authors: Seal, Kelsey, Cimon, Karen (Author), Argáez, Charlene (Author)
Corporate Author: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health Rapid Response Service
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Ottawa Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health 2017, March 9, 2017
Edition:Version 1.0
Series:Rapid response report: summary with critical appraisal
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: National Center for Biotechnology Information - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Summary:Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) are considered an important public health problem. In a 2012 report by the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), it was estimated that 5% to 10% of patients hospitalized in Canada will develop a HAI. Pathogens (microorganisms) that cause HAIs can be transmitted from other patients, hospital personnel, or the hospital/medical centre environment. Microorganisms can be transmitted to patients via direct or indirect contact, and health care workers are often the conduit for this transmission. These microorganisms can include such pathogens as Clostridium difficile and antibiotic-resistant organisms such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The hands of a health care worker can become contaminated by any procedures involving contact with patients, including taking a pulse, blood pressure, or body temperature.
The purpose of this Rapid Response is to review the evidence-based guidelines regarding the optimal techniques and products for hand antisepsis, best practices for hand-drying post hand-washing, and the use of hand wipes in hospital or residential care settings. Recommendations from these guidelines may be useful to implement proper hand hygiene in clinical practice
The health care worker may then have contact with other patients, resulting in cross-transmission or cross-infection from health care worker to patient. The World Health Organization considers hand hygiene - handwashing using soap and water or a disinfectant hand rub - to be an important process in the prevention of pathogen transmission by the contact route. Proper techniques and products for hand antisepsis are important to remove microorganisms from the hands. Effective hand hygiene techniques include handwashing, hand wipes, and drying methods. Handwashing is an important technique that is used to remove visible soil or organic material to ensure the removal of microorganisms. Drying methods are important, as wet hands provide better conditions for the transmission of microorganisms. Hand wipes may be used to remove visible soil or organic material, especially when designated handwashing sinks are unavailable.
Physical Description:1 PDF file (21 pages) illustrations