Making sense of corruption

Corruption is a serious threat to prosperity, democracy and human well-being, with mounting empirical evidence highlighting its detrimental effects on society. Yet defining this threat has resulted in profound disagreement, producing a multidimensional concept. Tackling this important and provocativ...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Authors: Rothstein, Bo, Varraich, Aiysha (Author)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Cambridge Cambridge University Press 2017
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Cambridge Books Online - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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245 0 0 |a Making sense of corruption  |c Bo Rothstein, University of Oxford, United Kingdom, Aiysha Varraich, University of Gothenburg, Sweden 
260 |a Cambridge  |b Cambridge University Press  |c 2017 
300 |a viii, 177 pages  |b digital 
505 0 |a Corruption and the relevance of political science -- Mapping related disciplines -- The evolution of corruption as a concept -- Corruption and human rights -- Corruption and clientelism -- Corruption and patronage -- Corruption and patrimonialism -- Corruption, state capture and political particularism -- The Chinese exception and alternative -- In conclusion: what is the opposite of corruption? 
653 |a Political corruption 
653 |a Corruption 
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520 |a Corruption is a serious threat to prosperity, democracy and human well-being, with mounting empirical evidence highlighting its detrimental effects on society. Yet defining this threat has resulted in profound disagreement, producing a multidimensional concept. Tackling this important and provocative topic, the authors provide an accessible and systematic analysis of how our understanding of corruption has evolved. They identify gaps in the research and make connections between related concepts such as clientelism, patronage, patrimonialism, particularism and state capture. A fundamental issue discussed is how the opposite of corruption should be defined. By arguing for the possibility of a universal understanding of corruption, and specifically what corruption is not, an innovative solution to this problem is presented. This book provides an accessible overview of corruption, allowing scholars and students alike to see the far reaching place it has within academic research