Drug repurposing and repositioning workshop summary

"Drug development can be time-consuming and expensive. Recent estimates suggest that, on average, it takes 10 years and at least $1 billion to bring a drug to market. Given the time and expense of developing drugs de novo, pharmaceutical companies have become increasingly interested in finding...

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Main Author: Beachy, Sarah H.
Corporate Authors: Institute of Medicine (U.S.) Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health, Drug Repurposing and Repositioning (Workshop) (2013, Washington, D.C.)
Other Authors: Johnson, Samuel G. ([rapporteur]), Olson, Steve ([rapporteur]), Berger, Adam C. ([rapporteur])
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Washington, D.C. National Academies Press [2014]©2014, 2014
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: National Center for Biotechnology Information - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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245 0 0 |a Drug repurposing and repositioning  |h Elektronische Ressource  |b workshop summary  |c Sarah H. Beachy, Samuel G. Johnson, Steve Olson, and Adam C. Berger, rapporteurs ; Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health, Board on Health Sciences Policy, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies 
260 |a Washington, D.C.  |b National Academies Press  |c [2014]©2014, 2014 
300 |a xxii, 96 pages  |b illustrations  |c 23 cm 
505 0 |a Introduction and themes of the workshop -- The state of the science -- Enabling tools and technology -- Value propositions for drug repurposing -- Policy approaches and legal framework -- Increasing the efficiency and success of repurposing 
505 0 |a Includes bibliographical references (pages 57-63) 
653 |a United States 
653 |a Drug Discovery / methods 
653 |a Pharmaceutical Preparations / economics 
653 |a Drug Repositioning 
700 1 |a Johnson, Samuel G.  |e [rapporteur] 
700 1 |a Olson, Steve  |e [rapporteur] 
700 1 |a Berger, Adam C.  |e [rapporteur] 
710 2 |a Institute of Medicine (U.S.)  |b Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health 
710 2 |a Drug Repurposing and Repositioning (Workshop) (2013, Washington, D.C.) 
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520 |a "Drug development can be time-consuming and expensive. Recent estimates suggest that, on average, it takes 10 years and at least $1 billion to bring a drug to market. Given the time and expense of developing drugs de novo, pharmaceutical companies have become increasingly interested in finding new uses for existing drugs--a process referred to as drug repurposing or repositioning. Historically, drug repurposing has been largely an unintentional, serendipitous process that took place when a drug was found to have an offtarget effect or a previously unrecognized on-target effect that could be used for identifying a new indication. Perhaps the most recognizable example of such a successful repositioning effort is sildenafil. Originally developed as an anti-hypertensive, sildenafil, marketed as Viagra and under other trade names, has been repurposed for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Viagra generated more than $2 billion worldwide in 2012 and has recently been studied for the treatment of heart failure. Given the widespread interest in drug repurposing, the Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health of the Institute of Medicine hosted a workshop on June 24, 2013, in Washington, DC, to assess the current landscape of drug repurposing activities in industry, academia, and government. Stakeholders, including government officials, pharmaceutical company representatives, academic researchers, regulators, funders, and patients, were invited to present their perspectives and to participate in workshop discussions. Drug Repurposing and Repositioning is the summary of that workshop. This report examines enabling tools and technology for drug repurposing; evaluates the business models and economic incentives for pursuing a repurposing approach; and discusses how genomic and genetic research could be positioned to better enable a drug repurposing paradigm"--Publisher's description