Drug class review on Alzheimer's drugs final report

Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common adult form of dementia, is an age-associated neurodegenerative disorder pathologically characterized by the abnormal accumulation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular amyloid plaques in selected brain regions. Primary clinical mani...

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Main Authors: Hansen, Richard A., Gartlehner, Gerald. (Author), Kaufer, Daniel J. (Author), Lohr, Kathleen N. (Author)
Corporate Authors: Drug Effectiveness Review Project, RTI International-University of North Carolina Evidence-based Practice Center, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, Oregon Health & Science University Evidence-based Practice Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Portland, Oregon OHSU [2006], 2006
Series:Drug class reviews
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Collection: National Center for Biotechnology Information - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Summary:Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common adult form of dementia, is an age-associated neurodegenerative disorder pathologically characterized by the abnormal accumulation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular amyloid plaques in selected brain regions. Primary clinical manifestations of AD include the insidious onset and gradual progression of cognitive impairment affecting multiple domains. The two main types of AD currently recognized are a generally later-onset sporadic form, representing about 95% of all cases, and autosomal-dominant familial forms involving specific mutations in one of three genetic loci (APP, presenilin 1, and presenilin 2) and typically associated with the early-onset of AD symptoms. AD is estimated to affect 4.5 million individuals in the United States with an average course of about 8 to 10 years. The comprehensive management of AD entails both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions. Nonpharmacologic interventions primarily address behavioral disturbances and other sources of cognitive impairment. Pharmacologic strategies have focused on modulating disease-associated neurotransmitter alterations. The purpose of this review is to help policy makers and clinicians make informed choices about the use of the four ChEIs and memantine in the treatment of AD. We compare the efficacy, effectiveness, and safety (adverse events) of donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine, tacrine, and memantine in patients with mild to severe AD.
Item Description:Title from PDF title page. - "June 2006."
Physical Description:1 online resource (1 PDF file (205 pages))