Drug class review on calcium channel blockers : final report

Calcium channel blocking agents (CCBs) inhibit the movement of calcium ions across the cell membrane by blocking the L-type (slow) calcium ion channel. CCBs have Food and Drug Administration (FDA) indications for treating hypertension, angina, and supraventricular arrhythmias, depending on the speci...

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Main Authors: McDonagh, Marian S., Eden, Karen B. (Author), Peterson, Kim (Author)
Corporate Authors: Oregon Health & Science University Evidence-based Practice Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Drug Effectiveness Review Project
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Portland, Oregon Oregon Health & Science University 2005, [2005]
Series:Drug class reviews
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: National Center for Biotechnology Information - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Summary:Calcium channel blocking agents (CCBs) inhibit the movement of calcium ions across the cell membrane by blocking the L-type (slow) calcium ion channel. CCBs have Food and Drug Administration (FDA) indications for treating hypertension, angina, and supraventricular arrhythmias, depending on the specific drug. Calcium channel blocking agents are generally classified into three groups according to their chemical structure: benzothiazepines (diltiazem); phenylalkylamines (verapamil); and the dihydropyridines (amlodipine, bepridil, felodipine, isradipine, nicardipine, nifedipine, and nisoldipine). Because these groups are included in the same drug class, but have some differences in both mechanisms of action and side effects, there is concern that the effectiveness and safety may vary by dihydropyridine and non-dihydropyridine groupings. The purpose of this review is to compare the efficacy, effectiveness, and adverse effects of calcium channel blockers
Item Description:Title from PDF title page. - "March 2005."
Physical Description:1 PDF file (194 pages) illustrations