Comparative effectiveness of smoking cessation treatments for patients with depression : a systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence

Smoking is disproportionately higher among persons with depression (45% versus 22%). Furthermore, smokers with depression may experience more challenges when trying to make and maintain a quit attempt, such as greater negative mood symptoms from withdrawal, higher nicotine dependence, and greater li...

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Main Author: Gierisch, Jennifer M.
Corporate Authors: United States Department of Veterans Affairs, Durham VA Medical Center Evidence-based Synthesis Program Center
Other Authors: Bastian, Lori A.
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Washington, DC Department of Veterans Affairs 2010, [2010]
Series:Evidence-based synthesis program
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: National Center for Biotechnology Information - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Summary:Smoking is disproportionately higher among persons with depression (45% versus 22%). Furthermore, smokers with depression may experience more challenges when trying to make and maintain a quit attempt, such as greater negative mood symptoms from withdrawal, higher nicotine dependence, and greater likelihood of relapse, than smokers without depression. Despite the complex relationship between tobacco use and depression, smokers with depression are motivated to quit smoking and should be offered cessation services. Several evidence-based smoking cessation treatments are effective for the general population of smokers. Yet the comparative effectiveness of these strategies in smokers with depression is uncertain. Also, it is uncertain if factors that may facilitate targeted interventions, such as depression status, gender, and treatment sequencing (i.e., concurrent versus sequential) for mood and smoking cessation, differentially impact the effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions
Item Description:Title from PDF title page. - "November 2010."
Physical Description:1 PDF file (iv, 79 p. ill.))