The social world of intellectuals in the Roman Empire sophists, philosophers, and Christians

This book examines the role of social networks in the formation of identity among sophists, philosophers and Christians in the early Roman Empire. Membership in each category was established and evaluated socially as well as discursively. From clashes over admission to classrooms and communion to co...

Full description

Main Author: Eshleman, Kendra
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Cambridge Cambridge University Press 2012
Series:Greek culture in the Roman world
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Cambridge Books Online - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
LEADER 02579nmm a2200361 u 4500
001 EB000738428
003 EBX01000000000000000589860
005 00000000000000.0
007 cr|||||||||||||||||||||
008 140413 ||| eng
020 |a 9781139207300 
050 4 |a DG78 
100 1 |a Eshleman, Kendra 
245 0 0 |a The social world of intellectuals in the Roman Empire  |b sophists, philosophers, and Christians  |c Kendra Eshleman 
260 |a Cambridge  |b Cambridge University Press  |c 2012 
300 |a ix, 293 pages  |b digital 
505 0 |a "Who are you?": the social formation of identity -- 1. Inclusion and identity -- 2. Contesting competence: the ideal of self-determination -- 3. Expertise and authority in the early church -- 4. Defining the circle of sophists: Philostratus and the construction of the Second Sophistic -- 5. Becoming orthodox: heresiology as self-fashioning -- 6. Successions and self-definition -- 7. 'From such mothers and fathers': succession narratives in early Christian discourse -- Conclusion 
651 4 |a Rome / Intellectual life 
653 |a Social networks / Rome 
653 |a Social structure / Rome 
653 |a Group identity / Rome 
653 |a Identity (Philosophical concept) / History / To 1500 
653 |a Sophists (Greek philosophy) 
653 |a Second Sophistic movement 
653 |a Philosophers / Rome 
653 |a Christians / Rome 
041 0 7 |a eng  |2 ISO 639-2 
989 |b CBO  |a Cambridge Books Online 
490 0 |a Greek culture in the Roman world 
856 |u https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139207300  |x Verlag  |3 Volltext 
082 0 |a 305.5520937 
520 |a This book examines the role of social networks in the formation of identity among sophists, philosophers and Christians in the early Roman Empire. Membership in each category was established and evaluated socially as well as discursively. From clashes over admission to classrooms and communion to construction of the group's history, integration into the social fabric of the community served as both an index of identity and a medium through which contests over status and authority were conducted. The juxtaposition of patterns of belonging in Second Sophistic and early Christian circles reveals a shared repertoire of technologies of self-definition, authorization and institutionalization and shows how each group manipulated and adapted those strategies to its own needs. This approach provides a more rounded view of the Second Sophistic and places the early Christian formation of 'orthodoxy' in a fresh context