Relativistic Mechanics, Time and Inertia

To accept the special theory of relativity has, it is universally agreed, consequences for our philosophical views about space and time. Indeed some have found these consequences so distasteful that they have refused to accept special relativity, despite its many satis­ factory empirical results, an...

Full description

Main Author: Tocaci, E.
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Other Authors: Kilmister, C.W. (Editor)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Dordrecht Springer Netherlands 1985, 1985
Edition:1st ed. 1985
Series:Fundamental Theories of Physics
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
LEADER 02778nmm a2200301 u 4500
001 EB000713404
003 EBX01000000000000000566486
005 00000000000000.0
007 cr|||||||||||||||||||||
008 140122 ||| eng
020 |a 9789400964068 
100 1 |a Tocaci, E. 
245 0 0 |a Relativistic Mechanics, Time and Inertia  |h Elektronische Ressource  |c by E. Tocaci ; edited by C.W. Kilmister 
250 |a 1st ed. 1985 
260 |a Dordrecht  |b Springer Netherlands  |c 1985, 1985 
300 |a X, 260 p  |b online resource 
505 0 |a A. Aspects of Relativistic Mechanics -- A.I. General remarks -- A.II. Remarks on the theory of relativity -- A.III. The main aims of this work -- B. Time -- B.I. The concept of time -- B.II. Examples -- C. Inertia -- C.I. Use of time in defining some elements of space -- C.II. The inertia -- C.III. Some aspects of classical mechanics 
653 |a Mathematical physics 
653 |a Theoretical, Mathematical and Computational Physics 
700 1 |a Kilmister, C.W.  |e [editor] 
710 2 |a SpringerLink (Online service) 
041 0 7 |a eng  |2 ISO 639-2 
989 |b SBA  |a Springer Book Archives -2004 
490 0 |a Fundamental Theories of Physics 
856 |u https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-6406-8?nosfx=y  |x Verlag  |3 Volltext 
082 0 |a 530.1 
520 |a To accept the special theory of relativity has, it is universally agreed, consequences for our philosophical views about space and time. Indeed some have found these consequences so distasteful that they have refused to accept special relativity, despite its many satis­ factory empirical results, and so they have been forced to try to account for these results in alternative ways. But it is surprising that there is much less agreement about exactly what the philosophical conse­ quences are, especially when looked at in detail. Partly this arises because the results of the theory are derived in an elegant mathematical notation which can conceal as much as it reveals, and which, accord­ ingly, offers no incentive to engage in the thankless task of dissection. The present book is an essay in careful analysis of special relativity and the concepts of space and time that it employs. Those who are familiar with the theory will find here (almost) all the formulae with which they are familiar;but in many cases the interpretations given to the terms in these formulae will surprise them. I doubt if this is the last word about these inter­ pretations:but I believe that the book is valuable in ix Foreword x drawing attention to the possibility of more open dis­ cussion in general, and in particular to the fact that acceptance of the theory of relativity need not commit one to every detail of conventional interpretation of its terms