The Business of Shipping

T HIS VOL U M E has been written to describe the business side of a commercial enterprise whose field is the entire civilized world. Historically, the theory and knowledge of shipping management, as distinguished from the practical skills of seaman­ ship, have been transmitted from one generation to...

Full description

Main Author: Kendall, Lane C.
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Dordrecht Springer Netherlands 1986, 1986
Edition:Fifth Edition
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
LEADER 02797nmm a2200277 u 4500
001 EB000712433
003 EBX01000000000000000565515
005 00000000000000.0
007 cr|||||||||||||||||||||
008 140122 ||| eng
020 |a 9789400941175 
100 1 |a Kendall, Lane C. 
245 0 0 |a The Business of Shipping  |h Elektronische Ressource  |c by Lane C. Kendall 
250 |a Fifth Edition 
260 |a Dordrecht  |b Springer Netherlands  |c 1986, 1986 
300 |a X, 514 p  |b online resource 
505 0 |a The Beginning -- 11. The Ramifications of Containerization -- 12. The Ocean Bill of Lading -- 13. How Freight Rates Are Made -- 14. The Traffic Study -- 15. Steamship Conferences -- 16. The Logic of Steamship Scheduling -- 17. Scheduling and Bunkering -- 18. Planning for a New Ship -- 19. Passenger Cruises -- 20. Industrial and Special Carriers -- 21. Tanker Management -- 22. The American Shipping Subsidy System -- 23. The Business of Shipping -- Notes -- About the Author 
653 |a Science (General) 
653 |a Science, general 
710 2 |a SpringerLink (Online service) 
041 0 7 |a eng  |2 ISO 639-2 
989 |b SBA  |a Springer Book Archives -2004 
856 |u http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-4117-5?nosfx=y  |x Verlag  |3 Volltext 
082 0 |a 50 
520 |a T HIS VOL U M E has been written to describe the business side of a commercial enterprise whose field is the entire civilized world. Historically, the theory and knowledge of shipping management, as distinguished from the practical skills of seaman­ ship, have been transmitted from one generation to the next by word of mouth. Little has been put on paper, primarily because the finest exponents of the art of steamship management have been too busy with their day-to-day concerns to do so. The "working level" personnel often are superbly competent, but rarely qualify as liter­ ary craftsmen. It has been my aim, in preparing this analysis of the principles of the "business" of commercial shipping, to describe that which trans­ pires in the various divisions of a shipowning and operating organi­ zation. Insofar as possible, the procedures followed in the offices have been described and explained, as well as the underlying prin­ ciples of management by which their decisions are reached. In the process of learning the principles and practices that are set forth in these pages, I have spent ajoy-filled lifetime in associa­ tion with ships. It has been my good fortune to work in large and small American steamship offices, to operate a major cargo termi­ nal, to participate in establishing and putting into effect the policies of a world-girdling American steamship organization, and to teach young men these principles learned from experience as well as from precept