Logos and Life: The Three Movements of the Soul The Spontaneous and the Creative in Man’s Self-Interpretation-in-the-Sacred

PART I THE CRITIQUE OF REASON CONTINUED: FROM LOGOS TO ANTI-LOGOS 1. THE NEW CRITIQUE OF REASON A new critique of reason is the crucial task imposed on the philosophy of our times as we emerge more and more from so-called "modernism" into a historical phase which will have to take its own...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Tymieniecka, Anna-Teresa
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Dordrecht Springer Netherlands 1988, 1988
Edition:1st ed. 1988
Series:Analecta Husserliana, The Yearbook of Phenomenological Research
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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245 0 0 |a Logos and Life: The Three Movements of the Soul  |h Elektronische Ressource  |b The Spontaneous and the Creative in Man’s Self-Interpretation-in-the-Sacred  |c by Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka 
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505 0 |a Foreground -- I / Toward the Extended Phenomenology of The Soul: The Soul as the “Soil” of Life’s Forces and the Transmitter of Life’s Constructive Progress from the Primeval Logos of Life to Its Annihilation in the Anti-Logos of Man’s “Transnatural Telos” -- II / In Which the Principles of a New Phenomenological Explication of Spiritual Interiority, as Well as an Outline of its Philosophical Interpretation, are Proposed -- One The First Movement of The Soul: Radical Examination -- I / “Radical Examination” and the Current of Man’s Life -- II / The Second Movement of the Soul: Exalted Existence. The Discovery of the Finiteness of Life (Does the Soul Have Its Very Own Resources and Hidden Means for Passing beyond This Finitude ?) -- III / The Third Movement of the Soul: Toward Transcending -- Two Progress in the Life of the Soul as the Logos of Life Declines -- I / Inward “Communication” -- II / “Personal Truth” and the Essential Point of Communiscation -- Three The Secret Architecture of the Soul -- I / The Establishment of the “Inward Sacredness” of the Soul’s Quest -- II / The Dianoiac Thread of the Logos Running Through Our Polyphonic Exploration of the Pursuit of Destiny: Creative Self-Interpretation between the Self and the Other -- Notes -- Index of Names -- of Book 1 
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520 |a PART I THE CRITIQUE OF REASON CONTINUED: FROM LOGOS TO ANTI-LOGOS 1. THE NEW CRITIQUE OF REASON A new critique of reason is the crucial task imposed on the philosophy of our times as we emerge more and more from so-called "modernism" into a historical phase which will have to take its own paths and find its own determination. It may be considered that the main developmental line of modern times in its philosophy as well as in its culture at large was traced by the Cartesian cogito. The unfolding of Occidental philos­ ophy has culminated in reason or intellect's being awarded the central place. This is its specific trait. We can see a direct line of progression from the cogito to Kant's Critique. It is no wonder that this work is the landmark of modern philosophy. Kant's Critique was concerned with the foundation of the sciences. Edmund-Husserllaunched a second major, renewed, critique of reason, one which addresses not only the critical situation of the sciences but extends the critique even to the situation of Occidental culture as its malaise is diagnosed by this great thinker. Edmund Husserl voiced, in fact, the conviction that Occidental humanity has reached in our age the peak of its unfolding. His identify­ ing this peak with the formulation of phenomenological philosophy strikes at the point in which the significant and novel developments of Occidental culture and philosophy (phenomenology, that is) coincide