Rock Rheology

The present book is the result of work carried out over a period of about ten years by the author and his co-workers in order to describe more accurately the slow irreversible deformation in time of the rocks surrounding underground openings. To begin with, our efforts were directed toward a better...

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Main Author: Cristescu, N.
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Dordrecht Springer Netherlands 1989, 1989
Edition:1st ed. 1989
Series:Mechanics of Elastic and Inelastic Solids
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Table of Contents:
  • A1.9. Application to the crack kinking problem
  • A1.10. Some numerical and experimental results
  • Appendix 2. Creep and Stress Variation Around a Well or a Tunnel. A Numerical Approach
  • References
  • Author Index
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Mechanical Properties of Rocks
  • 2.1. Diagnostic tests
  • 2.2. Unconfined uniaxial compressive tests
  • 2.3. Other mechanical tests
  • 2.4. Triaxial tests
  • Exercises
  • 3. Creep of Rocks
  • 3.1. History of creep tests
  • 3.2. Uniaxial creep
  • 3.3. Mathematical model
  • 3.4. Examples
  • 3.5. Creep in triaxial stress-state
  • Exercises
  • 4. Volume Deformation
  • 4.1. Dilatancy and/or compressibility
  • 4.2. Volume compressibility
  • 4.3. Mathematical models for the hydrostatic compressibility of volume
  • 4.4. Volume dilatancy
  • 4.5. Rock dilatancy during creep
  • Exercises
  • 5. Classical Constitutive Equations
  • 5.1. The linear elastic model
  • 5.2. Plane strain elasticity in cylindrical coordinates
  • 5.3. Thick-walled tube subjected to internal and external pressures
  • 5.4. The general linear viscoelastic model
  • Exercises
  • 6. Rock ‘Elasticity’ at High Pressures
  • 6.1. The elastic moduli
  • 9.3. The energetic damage parameter
  • 9.4. Numerical examples
  • Exercises
  • 10. Stress states In-Situ
  • 10.1. Primary stress-state
  • 10.2. Secondary and relative stress fields
  • 10.3. Initial stresses and strains for the linear elastic model
  • 10.4. Primary states for the elasto-plastic constitutive equation
  • 10.5. Primary states for the linear viscoelastic model
  • 10.6. Primary states for the elastic/viscoplastic model
  • 10.7. Stresses and strains around underground openings
  • Exercises
  • 11. Creep and Dilatancy/Compressibility of Rocks Around Vertical Shafts and Oil Wells
  • 11.1. Formulation of the problem
  • 11.2. The linear elastic solution
  • 11.3. The linear viscoelastic rock
  • 11.4. The elastic/viscoplastic rock
  • 11.5. Dilatancy/compressibility and damage around a well
  • 11.6. A more general primary stress-state
  • Exercises
  • 12. Creep and Dilatancy/Compressibility of Rocks Around Horizontal Tunnels
  • 12.1. Formulation of the problem
  • 12.2. The elastic approach
  • 12.3. Creep around a tunnel according to a linear viscoelastic model
  • 12.4. Creep according to an elastic/viscoplastic model
  • 12.5. Creep, dilatancy/compressibility, damage, and failure around a tunnel
  • Exercises
  • 13. Tunnel Support Analysis
  • 13.1. Formulation of the problem
  • 13.2. Linear elastic support; linear viscoelastic rock
  • 13.3. Non-linear self-adjusting supports; linear viscoelastic rock
  • 13.4. Non-linear self-adjusting support; elastic/viscoplastic rock
  • Exercises
  • Appendix 1. A Short Introduction to Fracture Mechanics
  • A1.1. Introduction
  • A1.2. The fundamental relations of the plane theory of elasticity
  • A1.4. The main boundary-value problems
  • A1.5. The influence functions corresponding to the elementary crack
  • A1.6. The Griffith crack in the plane problem
  • A1.7. Stress intensity factors and criteria for the propagation of the crack
  • A1.8. Systems of rectilinear cracks
  • 6.2. Determination of elastic moduli by dynamic procedures
  • 6.3. Longitudinal and shear waves in the case of high stresses and finite strains
  • 6.4. Restrictions concerning the elastic parameters
  • Exercises
  • 7. Rock Plasticity
  • 7.1. Historical outline
  • 7.2. Constitutive hypotheses
  • 7.3. Constitutive equation
  • 7.4. Yield function and plastic potential
  • 7.5. Example for a dilatant rock
  • 7.6. Example of compressible/dilatant rock
  • 7.7. Generalization of the model for finite rotations
  • Exercises
  • 8. Elastic/Viscoplastic Constitutive Equations
  • 8.1. General considerations
  • 8.2. Experimental foundation
  • 8.3. Constitutive hypotheses
  • 8.4. Constitutive equations
  • 8.5. An example for a compressible/dilatant hard rock
  • 8.6. Examples for softer rocks
  • 8.7. A uniaxial example
  • 8.8. Acoustic emission
  • Exercises
  • 9. Damage and Failure of Rocks
  • 9.1. Classical short-time failure-strength criteria
  • 9.2. Some experimental evidence