On the Definition of Binding Domains in Spanish : Evidence from Child Language

Linguistic theory has recently experienced a shift in its conceptual approach from the formulation of descriptively adequate accounts of languages to the definition of principles and parameters claimed to reflect the initial structure of the language faculty, often termed Universal Grammar (UG). Lin...

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Main Author: Padilla, J.A.
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Dordrecht Springer Netherlands 1990, 1990
Edition:1st ed. 1990
Series:Studies in Theoretical Psycholinguistics
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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100 1 |a Padilla, J.A. 
245 0 0 |a On the Definition of Binding Domains in Spanish  |h Elektronische Ressource  |b Evidence from Child Language  |c by J.A. Padilla 
250 |a 1st ed. 1990 
260 |a Dordrecht  |b Springer Netherlands  |c 1990, 1990 
300 |a XVIII, 165 p  |b online resource 
505 0 |a 0 Introduction -- 0.1. Introduction -- 0.2. Universal Grammar -- 0.3. Anaphora -- 0.4. Theoretical Motivation -- Notes -- 1. Theoretical Background -- 1.1. Introduction -- 1.2. Anaphors and Pronominals within PPs in Simple Sentences -- 1.3. Referential Properties of Pronominal Subjects -- 3.2. Acquisition Issues -- Note -- 2. Previous Acquisition Literature -- 2.1. Development of Locality Principles and Binding Domains -- 2.2. The Role of Lexical Properties of Verbs in Grammatical Anaphora -- 2.3. Acquisition of the Subjunctive in Spanish -- 3. Rationale and Design -- 3.1. Experimental Design: Overview -- 3.2. Experimental Test: General Description -- 3.3. Experimental Design and Hypotheses -- 4. Methods and Procedures -- 4.1. Subjects -- 4.2. General Procedures -- 5. Results -- 5.1. Introduction -- 5.2. Base Study -- 5.3. Inflection Study -- 5.4. Lexical Class Study -- Notes -- 6. Discussion -- 6.1. Overview Summary and Interpretation of Results -- 6.2. Relation to Previous Acquisition Literature -- 6.3. Conclusions -- References 
653 |a Psycholinguistics 
653 |a Theoretical Linguistics 
653 |a Linguistics 
653 |a Romance Languages 
653 |a Psycholinguistics 
653 |a Romance languages 
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989 |b SBA  |a Springer Book Archives -2004 
490 0 |a Studies in Theoretical Psycholinguistics 
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520 |a Linguistic theory has recently experienced a shift in its conceptual approach from the formulation of descriptively adequate accounts of languages to the definition of principles and parameters claimed to reflect the initial structure of the language faculty, often termed Universal Grammar (UG). Linguistic experience is said to have the effect of guiding the child/linguist in fixing the unspecified parameters of U G to determine the grammar of his/her language. The study of anaphora has been of central concern as it addresses directly the innateness vs. experience issue. On the one hand, it is a part of all natural languages that is largely under­ determined by the data, and must therefore be included in the characterization of the initial state of the language faculty. On the other hand, although the principles that govern anaphora do not exhibit extreme variations across languages, a child/linguist must solve language specific issues for his/her language based on linguistic experience. This book examines a set of linguistic structures from both a theoretical and an experimental perspective. The purpose is to xv PREFACE xvi determine the roles of innateness and of experience in the devel­ opment of a child's theory of anaphora for his/her language