The Middle Ear : The Role of Ventilation in Disease and Surgery

For the middle ear to maintain its most important function, sound con­ duction, its pressure always needs to be kept around atmospheric level. The eustachian tube has long been believed to be the only organ playing the important role of pressure regulation of the middle ear. However, several phenome...

Full description

Main Author: Takahashi, Haruo
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Tokyo Springer Japan 2001, 2001
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
LEADER 03263nmm a2200265 u 4500
001 EB000710272
003 EBX01000000000000000563354
005 00000000000000.0
007 cr|||||||||||||||||||||
008 140122 ||| eng
020 |a 9784431683773 
100 1 |a Takahashi, Haruo 
245 0 0 |a The Middle Ear  |h Elektronische Ressource  |b The Role of Ventilation in Disease and Surgery  |c by Haruo Takahashi 
260 |a Tokyo  |b Springer Japan  |c 2001, 2001 
300 |a VIII, 105 p  |b online resource 
505 0 |a Ventilation and Pressure Regulation -- 1 Pressure Regulation by the Eustachian Tube -- 2 Pressure Regulation by Transmucosal Gas Exchange -- 3 Interrelation of the Eustachian Tube and Gas Exchange -- 4 Summary -- II Middle-Ear Pathophysiology After Ear Surgery -- 1 Transmucosal Gas Exchange Function After Ear Surgery -- 2 Mastoid Aeration After Ear Surgery -- 3 Posterior Canal-Wall Retraction After Ear Surgery -- 4 Summary -- III Choice of Mode of Ear Surgery -- 1 Canal-Wall-Up or Canal-Wall-Down? -- 2 Choice of Mode of Ear Surgery from the Viewpoint of Middle-Ear Ventilation -- 3 “Soft-Wall Reconstruction” of the Posterior Canal Wall -- 4 Anterior Tympanotomy, Posterior Tympanotomy -- 5 Summary -- IV Cholesteatoma in Relation to Middle-Ear Ventilation -- 1 Analysis of Cholesteatoma After Surgery for Noncholesteatomatous Otitis Media -- 2 Pathophysiology of Cholesteatoma -- 3 The Change from OME in Children to Cholesteatoma -- 4 Cholesteatoma and a Retra 
653 |a Otorhinolaryngology 
653 |a Otorhinolaryngology 
710 2 |a SpringerLink (Online service) 
041 0 7 |a eng  |2 ISO 639-2 
989 |b SBA  |a Springer Book Archives -2004 
856 |u https://doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-68377-3?nosfx=y  |x Verlag  |3 Volltext 
082 0 |a 617.51 
520 |a For the middle ear to maintain its most important function, sound con­ duction, its pressure always needs to be kept around atmospheric level. The eustachian tube has long been believed to be the only organ playing the important role of pressure regulation of the middle ear. However, several phenomena that cannot be explained solely by reference to eustachian tube function have gradually emerged. For instance, otitis media with effusion cannot always be produced experimentally by selectively eliminating the ventilatory function of the eustachian tube by excising the tensor veli pala­ tini muscle and the hamulus pterygoideus. Also, most cases of otitis media with effusion (OME) in children can heal in spite of persistently poor tubal function even in the convalescent stage. In recent decades, gas exchange in the middle ear, particularly through the mastoid mucosa, has gradually come to light as another ventilation or pressure-regulation system for the middle ear. Although numbers of studies have revealed important information about the physiology and patho­ physiology of this function, there have been only a few studies related to gas exchange that directly contributed to the field of clinical otology by clarifying the pathogenesis of otitis media or to improving its treatment. One of the biggest reasons for the paucity of studies appears to be lack of an appropriate clinical method for assessing the gas exchange function