Selection in One- and Two-Locus Systems

Most of these notes were presented as part of a two-quarter course on theoretical population genetics at The University of Chicago. Almost all the students were either undergraduates in mathematics or graduate students in the biological sciences. The only prerequisites were calculus and matrices. As...

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Main Author: Nagylaki, T.
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Berlin, Heidelberg Springer Berlin Heidelberg 1977, 1977
Edition:1st ed. 1977
Series:Lecture Notes in Biomathematics
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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245 0 0 |a Selection in One- and Two-Locus Systems  |h Elektronische Ressource  |c by T. Nagylaki 
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300 |a VIII, 210 p  |b online resource 
505 0 |a 1. Introduction -- 2. Asexual Haploid Populations -- 2.1 Selection -- 2.2 Mutation and Selection -- 2.3 Migration and Selection -- 2.4 Continuous Model with Overlapping Generations -- 2.5 Problems -- 3. Panmictic Populations -- 3.1 The Hardy-Neinberg Law -- 3.2 X-Linkage -- 3.3 Two Loci -- 3.4 Population Subdivision -- 3.5 Problems -- 4. Selection at an Autosomal Locus -- 4.1 Formulation for Multiple Alleles -- 4.2 dynamics with Two Alleles -- 4.3 Dynamics with Multiple Alleles -- 4.4 Two Alleles with Inbreeding -- 4.5 Variable Environments -- 4.6 Intra-Family Selection -- 4.7 Maternal Inheritance -- 4.8 Meiotic Drive\ -- 4.9 Mutation and Selection -- 4.10 Continuous Model with Overlapping Generations -- 4.11 Problems -- 5. Nonrandom Mating -- 5.1 Seifing with Selection -- 5.2 Assortative Mating with Multiple Alleles and Distinguishable Genotypes -- 5.3 Assortative Mating with Two Alleles and Complete -- Dominance -- 5.4 Random Mating with Differential Fertility -- 5.5 Self-Incompat 
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653 |a Mathematics, general 
653 |a Biomedicine, general 
653 |a Life Sciences, general 
653 |a Mathematics 
653 |a Medicine 
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520 |a Most of these notes were presented as part of a two-quarter course on theoretical population genetics at The University of Chicago. Almost all the students were either undergraduates in mathematics or graduate students in the biological sciences. The only prerequisites were calculus and matrices. As is done in these notes, biological background and additional mathematical techniques were covered when they were required. I have included the relevant problems assigned in the course. My aim in these notes is to formulate the various models fairly generally, making the biological assumptions quite explicit, and to perform the analyses relatively rigorously. I hope the choice and treatment of topics will enable the reader to understand and evaluate detailed analyses of specific models and applications in the literature. No attempt has been made to review the literature or to assign credit. Most of the references are to papers directly germane to the subjects and approaches covered here. Frequency of reference is not intended to reflect proportionate contribution. I am very grateful to Professor James F. Crow for helpful comments and to Mrs. Adelaide Jaffe for her excellent typing. I thank the National Science Foundation for its support (Grant No. DEB76-01550)