Biodiversity and Ecosystem Processes in Tropical Forests

Although biologists have directed much attention to estimating the extent and causes of species losses, the consequences for ecosystem functioning have been little studied. This book examines the impact of biodiversity on ecosystem processes in tropical forests - one of the most species-rich and at...

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Bibliographic Details
Other Authors: Orians, Gordon H. (Editor), Dirzo, Rodolfo (Editor), Cushman, J. Hall (Editor)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Berlin, Heidelberg Springer Berlin Heidelberg 1996, 1996
Edition:1st ed. 1996
Series:Ecological Studies, Analysis and Synthesis
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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100 1 |a Orians, Gordon H.  |e [editor] 
245 0 0 |a Biodiversity and Ecosystem Processes in Tropical Forests  |h Elektronische Ressource  |c edited by Gordon H. Orians, Rodolfo Dirzo, J. Hall Cushman 
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260 |a Berlin, Heidelberg  |b Springer Berlin Heidelberg  |c 1996, 1996 
300 |a XII, 220 p  |b online resource 
505 0 |a 1 Introduction -- References -- 2 Plant Species Diversity and Ecosystem Functioning in Tropical Forests -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 The Dependence of Ecosystem Processes on Species Diversity -- 2.3 Plant Species Richness in Tropical Forests -- 2.4 The Primary Productivity of Tropical Forests -- 2.5 The Stability of Tropical Forests -- 2.6 Conclusions -- References -- 3 Consumer Diversity and Secondary Production -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Secondary Production and Biodiversity -- 3.3 Evolutionary Effects of Consumers on Ecosystem Properties -- 3.4 Ecological Effects of Consumers on Ecosystem Properties -- 3.5 Conclusion -- References -- 4 Biodiversity and Biogeochemical Cycles -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Species Richness and Biogeochemical Cycling -- 4.3 Functional Diversity and Biogeochemistry -- 4.4 Evidence from Experimental Studies -- 4.5 Conclusions -- References -- 5 Microbial Diversity and Tropical Forest Functioning -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 The Knowledge Base --  
505 0 |a 5.3 Food Chains -- 5.4 Pathogens -- 5.5 Microbial Contributions to Global Biogeochemistry -- 5. 6 Nutrient Cycling -- 5.7 Plant Endophytes -- 5.8 Threats to the Microbiota and the Processes They Mediate -- 5.9 Conclusions -- References -- 6 Plant Life-Forms and Tropical Ecosystem Functioning -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Classification -- 6.3 Biogeographical Patterns -- 6.4 Environmental Correlates of Life-Form Diversity -- 6.5 Episodic Impacts on Life-form Diversity -- 6.6 Life-Forms and Succession -- 6. 7 Implications of Loss of Life-Forms -- 6.8 Conclusions -- References -- 7 Functional Group Diversity and Recovery from Disturbance -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Functional Groups Affecting Tropical Forest Dynamics -- 7.3 Functional Groups and Natural Disturbance Processes in Tropical Moist Forests -- 7.4 Anthropogenic Disturbances to Tropical Forests -- 7.5Functional Groups in Tropical Dry Forests -- 7.6 Redundancy within Functional Groups -- 7.7 Conclusions -- References --  
505 0 |a 8 Species Richness and Resistance to Invasion -- 8.1 Diversity vs. Stability -- 8.2 Global Patterns -- 8.3 Intentional Introductions -- 8.4 Invasions into Undisturbed Tropical Forests -- 8.5 Speculations -- References -- 9 The Role of Biodiversity in Tropical Managed Ecosystems -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Examples of Tropical Managed Ecosystems -- 9.3 Plant Diversity and Primary Productivity -- 9.4 Plant Diversity and Primary Consumers -- 9.5 Plant Diversity and Secondary Consumers -- 9.6 Conclusions -- References -- 10 Synthesis -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Environmental Gradients -- 10.3 Biodiversity and Functioning of Tropical Forests -- 10.4 Energy Flow -- 10.5 Materials Processing -- 10.6 Functional Properties over Longer Temporal Scales -- 10.7 Functional Properties Over Larger Spatial Scales -- 10.8 Biodiversity and Responses to Disturbances -- 10.9 Research Agenda -- 10.10 Conclusions -- References -- Species Index -- Topical Index 
653 |a Conservation biology 
653 |a Conservation Biology 
653 |a Earth System Sciences 
653 |a Forestry 
653 |a Physical geography 
653 |a Ecology  
653 |a Agriculture 
653 |a Ecology 
700 1 |a Dirzo, Rodolfo  |e [editor] 
700 1 |a Cushman, J. Hall  |e [editor] 
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520 |a Although biologists have directed much attention to estimating the extent and causes of species losses, the consequences for ecosystem functioning have been little studied. This book examines the impact of biodiversity on ecosystem processes in tropical forests - one of the most species-rich and at the same time most endangered ecosystems on earth. It covers the relationships between biodiversity and primary production, secondary production, biogeochemical cycles, soil processes, plant life forms, responses to disturbance, and resistance to invasion. The analyses focus on the key ecological interfaces where the loss of keystone species is most likely to influence the rate and stability of ecosystem processes