Advances in Comparative and Environmental Physiology Electrogenic Cl? Transporters in Biological Membranes Volume 19

Biological cell membranes regulate the transfer of matter and informa­ tion between the intracellular and extracellular compartments as basic survival and maintenance functions for an organism: This volume contains a series of reviews that are concerned with how biological plasma membranes regulate...

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Bibliographic Details
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Berlin, Heidelberg Springer Berlin Heidelberg 1994, 1994
Edition:1st ed. 1994
Series:Advances in Comparative and Environmental Physiology
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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245 0 0 |a Advances in Comparative and Environmental Physiology  |h Elektronische Ressource  |b Electrogenic Cl? Transporters in Biological Membranes Volume 19 
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505 0 |a 2. Excitable Cell Cl? Channels -- 3. Aplysia Gut Absorptive Cells -- References -- 9 Chloride Channels in Insects: A Search for Common Grounds -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Defining Characteristics of Vertebrate Epithelial Cl? Channels -- 3 Cl? Channels in Insect Epithelial Secretion and Absorption -- 4 GABA-Activated Cl? Channel in Nervous System and Muscle -- 5 Conclusions -- References -- 10 The Voltage-Gated Cl? Channel of Torpedo Electroplax: an Emerging View of its Structure and Function -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Electrocyte Physiology -- 3 Biophysics of the Cl? Channel -- 4 Biochemical Studies -- 5 Molecular Genetics of the Cl? Channel -- 6 Conclusion -- References -- 11 A Secretory Cl Channel from Epithelial Cells Studied in Heterologous Expression Systems -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Channels Implicated in Transepithelial Chloride Secretion -- 3 CFTR Expression and Reconstitution Generate the Low-Conductance Cl Channel -- 4 Properties of the CFTR Pore --  
505 0 |a 5 Regulation of the CFTR Channel by Phosphorylation -- 6 Regulation of CFTR Channel by Nucleotides -- 7 Homologs from Other Species: Shark CFTR is also a Cl Channel -- 8 Conclusions -- References -- 12 Chloride Channels in Epithelial Cells of Intestine -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Small Intestine -- 3 Colon -- 4 Summary -- References -- 13 Chloride Transport by Gastric Mucosa -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Acidic and Nonacidic Cl? Secretion -- 3 Identification and Localization of Ion Transport Pathways -- 4 Localization of Passive Ion Transporters -- References 
505 0 |a 2 Cl?-Stimulated ATPase in Mammalian Brain -- 3 Functional Significance of Cl? Pump in the Brain -- 4 Conclusions -- References -- 5 Proton-Coupled Chloride Transport in Plant Cells -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Evidence for Gradient-Coupled Cl? Transport -- 3 Kinetic Properties of Gradient-Coupled Cl? Transport at the Plasma Membrane -- 4 Conclusions and Future Prospects -- References -- 6 Electrogenic Coupling of Sulfate Secretion to Chloride Transport in Lobster Hepatopancreas -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Vertebrate Sulfate Transport Mechanisms -- 3 Transmembrane SO4/C1 Exchange in Vertebrate Epithelia -- 4 Transmembrane Sulfate Antiport in Hepatopancreatic Epithelium -- 5 Transcellular Sulfate Transport in Lobster Hepatopancreas -- References -- 7 Chloride Currents in Lower Organisms -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Protists -- 3 Porifera -- 4 Cnidaria -- 5 Platyhelminths -- 6Nematodes -- 7 Discussion -- References -- 8 Chloride Channels in Molluscs -- 1. Introduction --  
505 0 |a 1 Halorhodopsin: A Prokaryotic Light-Driven Active Chloride Transport System -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Anion Binding and the Retinal Chromophore as Reporter Group -- 3 The Photocycle -- 4 Light-Dependent Retinal Isomerizations and Schiff Base Deprotonation -- 5 Hypotheses of the Transport Mechanism -- References -- 2 Chloride ATPase in Marine Algae -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Objects -- 3 Some Conditions -- 4 Basic Observations: The Pump and Its Transportée -- 5 Fueling Substrate -- 6 Electrical Properties -- 7 Biochemical Approaches -- 8 Conclusions and Speculations -- References -- 3 Existence of a Chloride Pump in Molluscs -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Electrical Characteristics of Aplysia Gut -- 3 Biochemistry of the Cl? Pump -- 4 Sulfhydryl Ligands of the Cl? Pump -- 5 Reconstitution of the Cl? Pump -- 6 Molecular Weight and Reaction Sequence of the Cl? Pump -- 7 Conclusions -- References -- 4 Transporting Cl?-ATPase in Rat Brain -- 1 Introduction --  
653 |a Cell Biology 
653 |a Cytology 
653 |a Human Physiology 
653 |a Human physiology 
653 |a Biochemistry 
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520 |a Biological cell membranes regulate the transfer of matter and informa­ tion between the intracellular and extracellular compartments as basic survival and maintenance functions for an organism: This volume contains a series of reviews that are concerned with how biological plasma membranes regulate the transport of chloride between the intracellular and extracellular compartments of a cell. This book is also an attempt to analyze the molecular basis for the movement of chloride across a cell membrane. This volume is devoted to a diversity of electrogenic chloride transport mechanisms in representative cell membranes of all living things. The first section of the book (Chaps. 1-4) focuses on mech­ anisms of primary active chloride transport (i.e. photon or A TP-driven), while the second section (Chaps. 5-6) centers on secondary active chloride transporters (symport and antiport) in both plant and animal plasma membranes. The last section, which comprises seven chapters (Chaps. 7-13), deals with chloride channels in cell membranes of prokaryocytes and eukaryocytes of most every phylum. It is hoped that with this particular ordering the reader can glean a telescopic view of the evolutionary history of the various electrogenic chloride transporters