Nuclear Models

Theoretical physics has become a many-faceted science. For the young student it is difficult enough to cope with the overwhelming amount of new scientific material that has to be learned, let alone to obtain an overview of the entire field, which ranges from mechanics through electrodynamics, quantu...

Full description

Main Authors: Greiner, Walter, Maruhn, Joachim A. (Author)
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Berlin, Heidelberg Springer Berlin Heidelberg 1996, 1996
Edition:1st ed. 1996
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
LEADER 03582nmm a2200325 u 4500
001 EB000667879
003 EBX01000000000000000520961
005 00000000000000.0
007 cr|||||||||||||||||||||
008 140122 ||| eng
020 |a 9783642609701 
100 1 |a Greiner, Walter 
245 0 0 |a Nuclear Models  |h Elektronische Ressource  |c by Walter Greiner, Joachim A. Maruhn 
250 |a 1st ed. 1996 
260 |a Berlin, Heidelberg  |b Springer Berlin Heidelberg  |c 1996, 1996 
300 |a XVI, 376 p  |b online resource 
505 0 |a 1. Introduction -- 1.1 Nuclear Structure Physics -- 1.2 The Basic Equation -- 1.3 Microscopic versus Collective Models -- 1.4 The Role of Symmetries -- 2. Symmetries -- 2.1 General Remarks -- 2.2 Translation -- 2.3 Rotation -- 2.4 Isospin -- 2.5 Parity -- 2.6 Time Reversal -- 3. Second Quantization -- 3.1 General Formalism -- 3.2 Representation of Operators -- 3.3 Evaluation of Matrix Element for Fermions -- 3.4 The Particle-Hole Picture -- 4. Group Theory in Nuclear Physics -- 4.1 Lie Groups and Lie Algebras -- 4.2 Group Chains -- 4.3 Lie Algebras in Second Quantization -- 5. Electromagnetic Moments and Transitions -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 The Quantized Electromagnetic Field -- 5.3 Radiation Fields of Good Angular Momentum -- 5.4 Coupling of Radiation and Matter -- 6. Collective Models -- 6.1 Nuclear Matter -- 6.2 Nuclear Surface Deformations -- 6.3 Surface Vibrations -- 6.4 Rotating Nuclei -- 6.5 The Rotation-Vibration Model -- 6.6 ?-Unstable Nuclei -- 6.7 More General Collectiv 
653 |a Nuclear physics 
653 |a Nuclear fusion 
653 |a Nuclear Physics, Heavy Ions, Hadrons 
653 |a Heavy ions 
653 |a Nuclear Fusion 
700 1 |a Maruhn, Joachim A.  |e [author] 
710 2 |a SpringerLink (Online service) 
041 0 7 |a eng  |2 ISO 639-2 
989 |b SBA  |a Springer Book Archives -2004 
856 |u https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-60970-1?nosfx=y  |x Verlag  |3 Volltext 
082 0 |a 539.7092 
520 |a Theoretical physics has become a many-faceted science. For the young student it is difficult enough to cope with the overwhelming amount of new scientific material that has to be learned, let alone to obtain an overview of the entire field, which ranges from mechanics through electrodynamics, quantum mechanics, field theory, nuclear and heavy-ion science, statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, and solid­ state theory to elementary-particle physics. And this knowledge should be acquired in just 8-10 semesters during which, in addition, a Diploma or Master's thesis has to be worked on or examinations prepared for. All this can be achieved only if the university teachers help to introduce the student to the new disciplines as early on as possible, in order to create interest and excitement that in turn set free essential new energy. Naturally, all inessential material must simply be eliminated. At the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt we therefore confront the student with theoretical physics immediately in the first semester. Theoretical Mechanics I and II, Electrodynamics, and Quantum Mechanics I - an Introduction are the basic courses during the first two years. These lectures are supplemented with many mathematical explanations and much support material. After the fourth semester of studies, graduate work begins and Quantum Mechanics II - Symme­ tries, Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics, Relativistic Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Electrodynamics, the Gauge Theory of Weak Interactions, and Quantum Chromodynamics are obligatory