Statistical Quality Control for the Food Industry

Considering the ability of food processing companies to consistently manu­ facture safe foods with uniform quality over the past 20 or 30 years without these new tools and new systems, one might expect that quality control improvements would be marginal. On the other hand, these changes have already...

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Main Author: Hubbard, Merton
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: New York, NY Springer US 1996, 1996
Edition:1st ed. 1996
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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245 0 0 |a Statistical Quality Control for the Food Industry  |h Elektronische Ressource  |c by Merton Hubbard 
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260 |a New York, NY  |b Springer US  |c 1996, 1996 
300 |a XV, 327 p. 19 illus  |b online resource 
505 0 |a 1 Introduction -- 2 Food Quality Systems -- 3 Control Charts -- 4 Fundamentals -- 5 Sampling -- 6 Test Methods -- 7 Product Specifications -- 8 Process Capability -- 9 Process Control -- 10 Sensory Testing -- 11 Net Content Control -- 12 Design of Experiments -- 13 Vendor Quality Assurance -- 14 Implementing a Quality Control Program -- 15 The Computer and Process Control 
653 |a Reliability 
653 |a Food—Biotechnology 
653 |a Industrial safety 
653 |a Quality Control, Reliability, Safety and Risk 
653 |a Food Science 
653 |a Quality control 
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520 |a Considering the ability of food processing companies to consistently manu­ facture safe foods with uniform quality over the past 20 or 30 years without these new tools and new systems, one might expect that quality control improvements would be marginal. On the other hand, these changes have already provided sub­ stantial opportunities for process and product improvement. This second edition is intended to update the basic concepts and discuss some of the new ones. Preface to the First Edition If an automobile tire leaks or an electric light switch fails, if we are short-changed at a department store or erroneously billed for phone calls not made, if a plane de­ parture is delayed due to a mechanical failure-these are rather ordinary annoy­ ances which we have come to accept as normal occurrences. Contrast this with failure of a food product. If foreign matter is found in a food, if a product is discolored or crushed, if illness or discomfort occurs when a food product is eaten-the consumer reacts with anger, fear, and sometimes mass hys­ teria. The offending product is often returned to the seller, or a disgruntled letter is written to the manufacturer. In an extreme case, an expensive law suit may be filed against the company. The reaction is almost as severe if the failure is a dif­ ficult-to-open package or a leaking container. There is no tolerance for failure of food products