Computational Approaches to Novel Condensed Matter Systems Applications to Classical and Quantum Systems

This volume contains the lectures given at the Third Gordon Godfrey International Workshop on Computational Approaches to Novel Condensed Matter Systems which was held at The University of New South Wales July 12-17, 1993. Lecturers from Asia, Australia, Europe and North America gave a total of twen...

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Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Other Authors: Das, M.P. (Editor), Neilson, D. (Editor)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: New York, NY Springer US 1995, 1995
Edition:1st ed. 1995
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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245 0 0 |a Computational Approaches to Novel Condensed Matter Systems  |h Elektronische Ressource  |b Applications to Classical and Quantum Systems  |c edited by M.P. Das, D. Neilson 
250 |a 1st ed. 1995 
260 |a New York, NY  |b Springer US  |c 1995, 1995 
300 |a VIII, 280 p. 77 illus  |b online resource 
505 0 |a An Overview -- to Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations of Electronic Systems -- Density Functionals, Molecular Dynamics, and More -- Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations in Solids -- Computer Simulation of Materials Using Parallel Architectures -- Molecular Dynamics on a Massively Parallel Computer for Application to Surface Systems -- Friedel Oscillations in Condensed Matter Calculations -- Collective Electronic Oscillations on C60 -- Theoretical Studies of Semiconductor Surfaces with Particular Reference to Fluorine and Chlorine Chemisorption on Si(001) -- Functional Integral Techniques in Condensed Matter Physics -- Disordered Electronic Materials and Spin Glasses -- Freezing: Density Functional Theory -- Application of the Local Chemical Potential to the Quantum Hall Effect in a Ballistic Quantum Wire -- Finite Lattice Calculations for Magnetic Systems 
653 |a Spectroscopy 
653 |a Solid State Physics 
653 |a Spectroscopy and Microscopy 
653 |a Crystallography 
653 |a Microscopy 
653 |a Condensed Matter Physics 
653 |a Condensed matter 
653 |a Crystallography and Scattering Methods 
653 |a Solid state physics 
700 1 |a Neilson, D.  |e [editor] 
710 2 |a SpringerLink (Online service) 
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520 |a This volume contains the lectures given at the Third Gordon Godfrey International Workshop on Computational Approaches to Novel Condensed Matter Systems which was held at The University of New South Wales July 12-17, 1993. Lecturers from Asia, Australia, Europe and North America gave a total of twenty-nine lectures which were spread over the five days. Unfortunately we were not able to include in this volume the lectures of S. Das Sarma from the University of Maryland on "Non-Equilibrium Growth as a Self-Organised Phenomenon" due to constraints of time. The workshops have been held annually since 1991 in Sydney, each covering a novel research area in condensed matter physics that is of topical interest. Australia has a strong tradition of research in condensed matter physics. The workshops are jointly organised by the School of Physics at the University of New South Wales (Sydney) and the Department of Theoretical Physics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering at the Australian National University (Canberra). The late Gordon God­ frey was an Associate Professor of Physics at the University of New South Wales. He bequeathed his estate for the promotion and teaching of theoretical physics within the university. The primary purpose of each workshop is to expose post-graduate students in physics to both informal interaction and formal lectures from recognised international leaders in topical research areas. Past experience has demonstrated again and again that to be informed about a new field there is no substitute for personal contact and interaction