Protein Metabolism of the Nervous System

Few can deny the paramount importance of the neurosciences, undoubtedly one of the most challenging fields in contemporary science. Recent years have witnessed the awakening of interest in brain research by many dis­ tinguished investigators from other branches of science, which has made possible th...

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Main Author: Lajtha, Abel
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Boston, MA Springer US 1970, 1970
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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245 0 0 |a Protein Metabolism of the Nervous System  |h Elektronische Ressource  |c edited by Abel Lajtha 
260 |a Boston, MA  |b Springer US  |c 1970, 1970 
300 |a XXII, 732 p. 76 illus  |b online resource 
505 0 |a Metabolism Related to Pathology -- 30 Hydrosoluble Proteins of Human Nervous Tissue -- 31 Studies on Proteinase Enzymes during Wallerian Degeneration -- 32 Inhibition of Brain Protein Synthesis -- 33 Studies on a Tissue-Specific Histone from Pig Brain -- 34 Problems Relating to the Protein-Eliciting Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis -- 35 Specificity of Myelin Basic Proteins -- 36 Transglutaminase Changes in the Brain and other Tissues during Allergic Encephalomyelitis -- 37 Mescaline and Phenothiazines: Recent Studies on Subcellular Localization and Effects upon Membranes -- 38 The Effect of Drugs on Protein Synthesis in the Nervous System 
505 0 |a Alterations of Metabolism -- 21 Macromolecular Aspects of the Nerve Growth Factor Proteins -- 22 Regulation by Amino Acids of Protein Synthesis in a Cell-Free System from Immature Rat Brain: Stimulatory Effect of ?-Aminobutyric Acid and Glycine -- 23 Changes in RNA and Proteins Induced by Stimulation -- 24 Effects of Actinomycin D on RNA Transcription, Protein Synthesis, and Nuclear Structure -- 25 The Breakdown of Polysomes and the Stimulation of Protein Synthesis as Cerebral Mechanisms of Defense against Seizures --  
505 0 |a Metabolism Related to Turnover -- 1 Protein Synthesis in the Nervous System -- 2 Developmental Changes in Peptide-Bond Hydrolases -- 3 Breakdown of Proteins: Protamine-Splitting Enzyme -- 4 Localization of Protein Metabolism in Neurons -- 5 Membrane-Bound and Free Ribosomes in the Developing Rat Brain -- 6 Regulation of Transcription in Nervous Cells -- 7 Insoluble Proteins of the Synaptic Plasma Membrane -- 8 Protein Turnover in Membranous Fractions -- 9 Assimilation of Glucose in Rat Brain and Metabolic Activities of Various Groups of Brain Proteins -- II: Metabolism Related to Function -- 10 Protein Metabolism and Functional Activity -- 11 The Axon as a Heuristic Model for Studying Membrane Protein-Synthesizing Machinery -- 12 The Biosynthesis of Proteins within Axons and Synaptosomes -- 13 Fast Axoplasmic Flow of Proteins and Polypeptides in Mammalian Nerve Fibers -- 14 Effect of Electrical and Chemical Stimulation on Protein Synthesis in Brain Slices --  
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520 |a Few can deny the paramount importance of the neurosciences, undoubtedly one of the most challenging fields in contemporary science. Recent years have witnessed the awakening of interest in brain research by many dis­ tinguished investigators from other branches of science, which has made possible the multidisciplinary approach needed for the complex problems of this field. The present book, which deals with one aspect of this research, is the result of the symposium held under the auspices of the New York State Research Institute for Neurochemistry and Drug Addiction in April 1968. It has become clear that brain proteins are involved in all aspects of mental function and dysfunction, and the present volume documents the latest advances in our knowledge (advances made to a large extent by con­ tributors to this volume). The chapters not only convey some of the enthu­ siasm and wonderful, cooperative spirit of the many excellent scientists ex­ ploring the brain, and their wealth of ideas; they also illustrate the many approaches from which cerebral proteins can be studied in a meaningful manner. In some areas even preliminary evidence is worth discussing: e.g., it is an exciting achievement that we can begin to apply the disciplines of bio­ chemistry to phenomena of learned behavior and information handling