Energy Economics: A Modern Introduction

"Energy is the go of things", as James Clerk Maxwell pointed out. This th simple truth was largely overlooked during the first 70 years of the 20 century, because in the industrial world most politicians, civil servants, and opinion makers were inclined to believe that virtually an infinit...

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Main Author: Banks, Ferdinand E.
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: New York, NY Springer US 2000, 2000
Edition:1st ed. 2000
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
Table of Contents:
  • a Statistical Observation; the Winner’s Curse; and Real Options
  • 9.4 Conclusion: From the 20TH to The 21ST Century
  • 10. Appendix
  • A.1 Extra Questions
  • A.2 Answers and Partial Answers to Selected Exercises.
  • A.3 Glossary
  • A.4 References
  • 11. Index
  • an Introductory Survey
  • 1.1 Some Basic Ideas
  • 1.2 Units and Heat Equivalents
  • 1.3 More Basic Ideas
  • 1.4 Conclusions
  • 2. Discounting and Capital Values
  • 2.1 First PrincipleS
  • 2.2 A Very Small Oil Well
  • 2.3 Annuities
  • 2.4 Some Comments on Capital Values
  • 2.5 Depletion
  • 2.6 Conclusions
  • 3. The World Oil Market
  • 3.1 Some Background for Studying the Run-Up to He Oil Market Endgame
  • 3.2 The Reserve-Production Ratio
  • 3.3 Oil Supply and Demand, and the Reserve-Production Ratio
  • 3.5 Oil Stocks And Oil Prices
  • 3.6 Conclusions
  • 3.7 Appendix: The Domestic Industrialization of Hydrocarbons
  • 4. A Fuel of The Future: Natural Gas
  • 4.1 Geology, Units, and Some Economics
  • 4.2 Economic Theory and Natural Gas: an Introduction
  • 4.2.1 Exercises
  • 4.3 Regulation and Deregulation
  • 4.4 Marginal Costs and Peak Load Pricing
  • 4.5 Conclusions
  • 5. Some Aspects of The World Coal Market
  • 5.1 Introducing Coal Supply and Demand
  • Some Transportation Economics
  • 6. Energy Derivatives: Futures, Options, and Swaps
  • 6.1 Futures Markets: Terminology and Nomenclature
  • 6.2 Further Mechanics of Hedging and Speculation
  • 6.3 Basis Risk
  • 6.4 An Options Fable
  • 6.5 The Simple Algebra of Options
  • 6.6 A Comment on the Option Price
  • 6.7 Oil Swaps
  • 6.8 Conclusions
  • 6.9 Appendix
  • 7. Electricity and Economics
  • 7.1 Some Introductory Remarks
  • 7.2 Daily Load Curves and Load Duration Curves
  • 7.3 The Economics of Load Division
  • 7.4 Some Final Observations on Electricity Tariffs
  • 7.5 Conclusions
  • 8. Uranium, Nuclear Energy, and an Introduction to Intertemporal Production Theory
  • 8.1 Some Nuclear Background
  • 8.2 Some Intertemporal Cost and Production Theory
  • 8.3 A Few Bad Nuclear Vibrations and a Comment on Option Theory
  • 8.4 Conclusion