Guidelines for Sensory Analysis in Food Product Development and Quality Control

Sensory testing has been in existence ever since man started to use his senses to judge the quality and safety of drinking water and foodstuffs. With the onset of trading, there were several developments that led to more formalized testing, involving professional tasters and grading systems. Many of...

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Main Authors: Carpenter, Roland P., Lyon, David H. (Author), Hasdell, Terry A. (Author)
Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: New York, NY Springer US 2000, 2000
Edition:2nd ed. 2000
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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100 1 |a Carpenter, Roland P. 
245 0 0 |a Guidelines for Sensory Analysis in Food Product Development and Quality Control  |h Elektronische Ressource  |c by Roland P. Carpenter, David H. Lyon, Terry A. Hasdell 
250 |a 2nd ed. 2000 
260 |a New York, NY  |b Springer US  |c 2000, 2000 
300 |a XXVIII, 210 p. 2 illus  |b online resource 
505 0 |a Specification and Quality Control -- 9.1 Background --  
505 0 |a Shelf-Life Studies -- 10.1 Background -- 10.2 Methods and Approaches -- 10.3 Analysis and Presentation of Results -- 11—Case History: Taint Investigation -- 11.1 Background -- 11.2 Methods -- 11.3 Results -- 12—Case History: Taint Prevention -- 12.1 Background -- 12.2 Methods -- 12.3 Results -- 13—Case History: Mapping of Coffee Products -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 Aims -- 13.3 Descriptive Analysis of Coffee -- 13.4 Implications for Product Matching/Mapping -- 13.5 Consumer Preferences for Coffee -- 13.6 Relating Consumer Preferences to Sensory Attributes -- 13.7 Implications for Product Matching/Mapping -- 14—Case History: Quality Control in Product Batching -- 14.1 Background -- 14.2 Methods and Approaches -- 14.3 Recommendations -- 15—Case History: Graphical Methods for Monitoring Profile Panel Performance -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 Methods and Results -- 15.3 Conclusions -- Appendixes --  
505 0 |a 1—What Is Sensory Analysis Used for? -- 1.1 Providing Answers to Practical Questions -- 1.2 Specifications and Quality Control -- 1.3 Shelf-Life Studies -- 1.4 Taint Potential -- 1.5 Product Matching -- 1.6 Product Reformulation -- 1.7 Product Mapping -- 1.8 Product Acceptability -- 2—The Relationship of Physiology and Psychology to Sensory Analysis -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 What Role Do the Senses Play? -- 2.3 How Do the Senses Interact? -- 2.4 Thresholds and Sensitivity -- 2.5 Individual Differences -- 2.6 Perception—The Link with the Senses -- 2.7 Which Psychological Factors May Affect Sensory Results? -- 3—How To Use Sensory Analysis To Meet Your Objective -- 3.1 Formulating the Objective -- 3.2 Decisions about Data -- 3.3 Tests Used To Achieve the Objective -- 3.4 Principles of Questionnaire Design -- 4—The Products for Sensory Analysis -- 4.1 The Nature of the Products -- 4.2 The Number of Products -- 4.3 The Assessment of the Products --  
505 0 |a Appendix A—Some Useful Tables for Sensory Tests -- Appendix B—Glossary of Terms Used in Sensory Analysis -- Appendix C—Some Useful Contacts 
653 |a Business and Management, general 
653 |a Reliability 
653 |a Business 
653 |a Food—Biotechnology 
653 |a Management science 
653 |a Industrial safety 
653 |a Quality Control, Reliability, Safety and Risk 
653 |a Food Science 
653 |a Quality control 
700 1 |a Lyon, David H.  |e [author] 
700 1 |a Hasdell, Terry A.  |e [author] 
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520 |a Sensory testing has been in existence ever since man started to use his senses to judge the quality and safety of drinking water and foodstuffs. With the onset of trading, there were several developments that led to more formalized testing, involving professional tasters and grading systems. Many of these grading systems are still in existence today and continue to serve a useful purpose, for example in assessing tea, coffee, and wines. However, there has also been a growing need for methods for well-repli­ cated, objective, unbiased sensory assessment, which can be applied rou­ tinely across a wide range of foods. Sensory analysis seeks to satisfy this need. Sensory analysis is not new to the food industry, but its application as a basic tool in food product development and quality control has not always been given the recognition and acceptance it deserves. This, we believe, is largely due to the lack of understanding about what sensory analysis can offer in product research, development, and marketing and a fear that the discipline is "too scientific" to be practical. To some extent, sensory scien­ tists have perpetuated this fear by failing to recognize the industrial con­ straints to implementing sensory testing procedures. These Guidelines are an attempt to redress the balance