Metallization of Polymers 2

As the demands put on the polymer/metal interface, particularly by the microelectronics industry, become more and more severe, the necessity for understanding this interface, its properties and its limitations, becomes more and more essential. This requires a broad knowledge of, and a familiarity wi...

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Corporate Author: SpringerLink (Online service)
Other Authors: Sacher, Edward (Editor)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: New York, NY Springer US 2002, 2002
Edition:1st ed. 2002
Subjects:
Online Access:
Collection: Springer Book Archives -2004 - Collection details see MPG.ReNa
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245 0 0 |a Metallization of Polymers 2  |h Elektronische Ressource  |c edited by Edward Sacher 
250 |a 1st ed. 2002 
260 |a New York, NY  |b Springer US  |c 2002, 2002 
300 |a VIII, 208 p  |b online resource 
505 0 |a Thin Film versus Nanoparticle -- 3. Ultra Thin Film Analysis Using the Thermo VG Scientifics Thetaprobe Instrument -- 4. Nanoindentation of Microsprings and Microcantilevers -- Low Permittivity Materials -- 5. Physical and Interfacial Properties of Low Permittivity Polymers: Cyclotene, SiLK and Ultra-Low K -- 6. Mechanical Properties of Cured Silk Low-K Dielectric Films -- 7. Plasma-Polymerized Fluoropolymer Thin Films for Microelectronic Applications -- Polymer Metallization -- 8. Fundamental Aspects of Polymer Metallization -- 9. The Study of Copper Clusters on Dow Cyclotene and Their Stability -- 10. Adsorption of Noble Metal Atoms on Polymers -- 11. Nucleation and Growth of Vapor-Deposited Metal Films on Self-Assembled Monolayers Studied by Multiple Characterization Probes -- Barrier Layers -- 12. Morphological Investigations 
653 |a Materials—Surfaces 
653 |a Physical chemistry 
653 |a Thin films 
653 |a Spectroscopy 
653 |a Solid State Physics 
653 |a Spectroscopy and Microscopy 
653 |a Physical Chemistry 
653 |a Polymers   
653 |a Microscopy 
653 |a Surfaces and Interfaces, Thin Films 
653 |a Polymer Sciences 
653 |a Solid state physics 
710 2 |a SpringerLink (Online service) 
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989 |b SBA  |a Springer Book Archives -2004 
856 |u https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-0563-1?nosfx=y  |x Verlag  |3 Volltext 
082 0 |a 541 
520 |a As the demands put on the polymer/metal interface, particularly by the microelectronics industry, become more and more severe, the necessity for understanding this interface, its properties and its limitations, becomes more and more essential. This requires a broad knowledge of, and a familiarity with, the latest findings in this rapidly advancing field. At the very least, such familiarity requires an exchange of infonnation, particularly among those intimately involved in this field. Communications among many of us in this area have made one fact quite obvious: the facilities provided by existing organizations, scientific and otherwise, do not offer the forum necessary to accomplish this exchange of infonnation. It was for this reason that Jean-Jacques Pireaux, Steven Kowalczyk and I organized the first Metallization of Polymers, a symposium sponsored by the American Chemical Society, which took place in Montreal, September 25-28, 1989; the Proceedings from that symposium were published as ACS Symposium Series 440, (1990). It is this same per­ ceived lack of a proper forum, and the encouragement of my colleagues, that prompted me to organize this meeting, so as to bring to the attention of the participants new instruments, materials, methods, advances, and, particularly, thoughts in the field of polymer metalliza­ tion. The meeting was designed as a workshop, with time being made available throughout for discussion and for the consideration of new findings